University differences in the graduation of minorities in STEM fields: Evidence from California

Peter Arcidiacono, Esteban Aucejo, V. Joseph Hotz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine differences in minority science graduation rates among University of California campuses when racial preferences were in place. Less prepared minorities at higher ranked campuses had lower persistence rates in science and took longer to graduate. We estimate a model of students' college major choice where net returns of a science major differ across campuses and student preparation. We find less prepared minority students at top ranked campuses would have higher science graduation rates had they attended lower ranked campuses. Better matching of science students to universities by preparation and providing information about students' prospects in different major- university combinations could increase minority science graduation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)525-562
Number of pages38
JournalAmerican Economic Review
Volume106
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Minorities
Graduation
Preparation
College major
Persistence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

University differences in the graduation of minorities in STEM fields : Evidence from California. / Arcidiacono, Peter; Aucejo, Esteban; Hotz, V. Joseph.

In: American Economic Review, Vol. 106, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 525-562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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