Union Business Leave Practices in Large U.S. Municipalities: An Exploratory Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines union business leave (UBL) or official time practices among the 77 largest municipalities in the United States. Specifically, it evaluates UBL practices as articulated in 231 collective bargaining agreements (CBAs) of police, firefighter, and nonsafety public employee unions. Results indicate that UBL is prevalent as 72% of unions receive some kind of UBL, most frequently paid leave financed by the city or through cost-sharing arrangements. Empirical findings suggest these practices are driven by political factors, and that resource constraints or the state or regional-level environment are nonsignificant. The article discusses these results and offers a series of policy recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-367
Number of pages26
JournalPublic Personnel Management
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

municipality
Industry
cost sharing
bargaining
political factors
Law enforcement
police
employee
Personnel
resources
Municipalities
Exploratory study
Costs
time

Keywords

  • official time
  • transparency
  • UBL
  • union business leave
  • union release time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Administration
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Union Business Leave Practices in Large U.S. Municipalities : An Exploratory Study. / Reilly, Thomas; Singla, Akheil.

In: Public Personnel Management, Vol. 46, No. 4, 01.12.2017, p. 342-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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