Underscoring Risk and Resilience Factors in Sexual and Gender Minority Relationships From Theory to Practice

Ashley K. Randall, Casey J. Totenhagen, Tyrel J. Starks

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

Abstract

In roughly the past 10 years, there has been a substantive expansion in research focused on the relationships of sexual and gender minority (SGM) individuals. This work gained momentum in research with male couples between 2009 and 2012 with the publication of data indicating that many— possibly most—new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are transmitted between main or primary (rather than casual or anonymous) sex partners (Goodreau et al., 2012, 2013; Sullivan et al., 2009). The societal and public health significance of SGM relationship research has been amplified by the United States’ recognition of same-sex marriages in 2015 (e.g., Ogolsky et al., 2019). Despite increased interest, disparities in research inclusion persist. Indeed, Williamson et al. (in press) surveyed articles published between 2014 and 2018 and found that only 4% focused exclusively on SGM participants or utilized samples that included at least 20% SGM participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-88
Number of pages6
JournalCouple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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