Undermanning theory and the workplace

Implications of Setting Size for Job Satisfaction and Social Support

Diana Oxley, Manuel Barrera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Undermanning theory has been identified as a useful tool for organizational and community psychologists. The research described here demonstrated the utility of this theory in two ways. First, it examined the applicability of undermanning theory to work settings. A model of causal relationships among the number of employees in a setting, setting claim, and several attitudinal and behavioral outcome variables was presented and tested using path analysis. The results provided support for the generalizability of undermanning theory and illuminated important linkages between setting claim and more traditional variables of interest to organizational psychologists, such as job satisfaction and organizational identification. Second, this research examined relationships among social support, sharing grievances, and other outcome measures in small and large work settings. These findings indicated that social support may be a mediating process in the relationship between setting size and employee attitudes and behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-234
Number of pages24
JournalEnvironment and Behavior
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

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workplace
path analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Undermanning theory and the workplace : Implications of Setting Size for Job Satisfaction and Social Support. / Oxley, Diana; Barrera, Manuel.

In: Environment and Behavior, Vol. 16, No. 2, 1984, p. 211-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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