Underlying Mechanisms in the Relationship Between Africentric Worldview and Depressive Symptoms

Enrique W. Neblett, Wizdom Powell Hammond, Eleanor Seaton, Tiffany G. Townsend

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines underlying mechanisms in the relationship between an Africentric worldview and depressive symptoms. Participants were 112 African American young adults. An Africentric worldview buffered the association between perceived stress and depressive symptoms. The relationship between an Africentric worldview and depressive symptoms was mediated by perceived stress and emotion-focused coping. These findings highlight the protective function of an Africentric worldview in the context of African Americans' stress experiences and psychological health and offer promise for enhancing African American mental health service delivery and treatment interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-113
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

African Americans
Depression
Mental Health Services
Psychological Stress
Young Adult
Emotions
Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Africentric worldview
  • coping
  • depression
  • resilience
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Underlying Mechanisms in the Relationship Between Africentric Worldview and Depressive Symptoms. / Neblett, Enrique W.; Hammond, Wizdom Powell; Seaton, Eleanor; Townsend, Tiffany G.

In: Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol. 57, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 105-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Neblett, Enrique W. ; Hammond, Wizdom Powell ; Seaton, Eleanor ; Townsend, Tiffany G. / Underlying Mechanisms in the Relationship Between Africentric Worldview and Depressive Symptoms. In: Journal of Counseling Psychology. 2010 ; Vol. 57, No. 1. pp. 105-113.
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