Ultraviolet and osmotic stresses induce and regulate the synthesis of mycosporines in the cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis PCC 6912

Anne Portwich, Ferran Garcia-Pichel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis PCC 6912 was found to synthesize and accumulate two putative UV sunscreen compounds of the mycosporine (mycosporine-like amino acid; MAA) type: mycosporine-glycine and shinorine. These MAAs were not constitutively present in the cells; their synthesis could be induced specifically either by exposure to UVB radiation (280-320 nm) or by osmotic stress, but not by other stress factors such as heat or cold shock, nutrient limitation, or photooxidative stress. A significant synergistic enhancement of MAA synthesis was observed when both stress factors were applied in combination. Although osmotic stress could induce MAA synthesis, comparison of the intracellular contents of MAAs with those of sugar osmolytes (glucose and trehalose) indicated that MAAs play no significant role in attaining osmotic homeostasis. UVB strongly enhanced the accumulation of shinorine, whereas osmotic stress had a more pronounced effect on mycosporine-glycine. This differential effect on the steady-state contents of each MAA could be explained either by differential regulation of biosynthesis or by differential loss rates of MAAs (leakage) under each condition. A preferential leakage of mycosporine-glycine from the cells after a hypoosmotic shock was detected. The results are interpreted in terms of an adaptive necessity for a combined regulatory control responding to both UV and external osmotic conditions in organisms that accumulate water-soluble sunscreens intracellularly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-192
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Microbiology
Volume172
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Osmotic Pressure
Cyanobacteria
Glycine
Sun hoods
Sunscreening Agents
Shock
Trehalose
Biosynthesis
Sugars
Nutrients
Homeostasis
Hot Temperature
Radiation
Amino Acids
Glucose
Food
Water
shinorine

Keywords

  • Cyanobacteria
  • Mycosporine-like amino acids
  • Osmotic stress
  • Salt stress
  • UV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology

Cite this

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title = "Ultraviolet and osmotic stresses induce and regulate the synthesis of mycosporines in the cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis PCC 6912",
abstract = "The cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis PCC 6912 was found to synthesize and accumulate two putative UV sunscreen compounds of the mycosporine (mycosporine-like amino acid; MAA) type: mycosporine-glycine and shinorine. These MAAs were not constitutively present in the cells; their synthesis could be induced specifically either by exposure to UVB radiation (280-320 nm) or by osmotic stress, but not by other stress factors such as heat or cold shock, nutrient limitation, or photooxidative stress. A significant synergistic enhancement of MAA synthesis was observed when both stress factors were applied in combination. Although osmotic stress could induce MAA synthesis, comparison of the intracellular contents of MAAs with those of sugar osmolytes (glucose and trehalose) indicated that MAAs play no significant role in attaining osmotic homeostasis. UVB strongly enhanced the accumulation of shinorine, whereas osmotic stress had a more pronounced effect on mycosporine-glycine. This differential effect on the steady-state contents of each MAA could be explained either by differential regulation of biosynthesis or by differential loss rates of MAAs (leakage) under each condition. A preferential leakage of mycosporine-glycine from the cells after a hypoosmotic shock was detected. The results are interpreted in terms of an adaptive necessity for a combined regulatory control responding to both UV and external osmotic conditions in organisms that accumulate water-soluble sunscreens intracellularly.",
keywords = "Cyanobacteria, Mycosporine-like amino acids, Osmotic stress, Salt stress, UV",
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T1 - Ultraviolet and osmotic stresses induce and regulate the synthesis of mycosporines in the cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis PCC 6912

AU - Portwich, Anne

AU - Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

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N2 - The cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis PCC 6912 was found to synthesize and accumulate two putative UV sunscreen compounds of the mycosporine (mycosporine-like amino acid; MAA) type: mycosporine-glycine and shinorine. These MAAs were not constitutively present in the cells; their synthesis could be induced specifically either by exposure to UVB radiation (280-320 nm) or by osmotic stress, but not by other stress factors such as heat or cold shock, nutrient limitation, or photooxidative stress. A significant synergistic enhancement of MAA synthesis was observed when both stress factors were applied in combination. Although osmotic stress could induce MAA synthesis, comparison of the intracellular contents of MAAs with those of sugar osmolytes (glucose and trehalose) indicated that MAAs play no significant role in attaining osmotic homeostasis. UVB strongly enhanced the accumulation of shinorine, whereas osmotic stress had a more pronounced effect on mycosporine-glycine. This differential effect on the steady-state contents of each MAA could be explained either by differential regulation of biosynthesis or by differential loss rates of MAAs (leakage) under each condition. A preferential leakage of mycosporine-glycine from the cells after a hypoosmotic shock was detected. The results are interpreted in terms of an adaptive necessity for a combined regulatory control responding to both UV and external osmotic conditions in organisms that accumulate water-soluble sunscreens intracellularly.

AB - The cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis PCC 6912 was found to synthesize and accumulate two putative UV sunscreen compounds of the mycosporine (mycosporine-like amino acid; MAA) type: mycosporine-glycine and shinorine. These MAAs were not constitutively present in the cells; their synthesis could be induced specifically either by exposure to UVB radiation (280-320 nm) or by osmotic stress, but not by other stress factors such as heat or cold shock, nutrient limitation, or photooxidative stress. A significant synergistic enhancement of MAA synthesis was observed when both stress factors were applied in combination. Although osmotic stress could induce MAA synthesis, comparison of the intracellular contents of MAAs with those of sugar osmolytes (glucose and trehalose) indicated that MAAs play no significant role in attaining osmotic homeostasis. UVB strongly enhanced the accumulation of shinorine, whereas osmotic stress had a more pronounced effect on mycosporine-glycine. This differential effect on the steady-state contents of each MAA could be explained either by differential regulation of biosynthesis or by differential loss rates of MAAs (leakage) under each condition. A preferential leakage of mycosporine-glycine from the cells after a hypoosmotic shock was detected. The results are interpreted in terms of an adaptive necessity for a combined regulatory control responding to both UV and external osmotic conditions in organisms that accumulate water-soluble sunscreens intracellularly.

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