Uganda's road to peace may run through the river of forgiveness: Designing playable fictions to teach complex values

Sasha Barab, Tyler Dodge, Edward Gentry, Asmalina Saleh, Patrick Pettyjohn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

While gaming technologies are typically leveraged for entertainment purposes, our experience and aspiration is to use them to encourage engagement with global, politically-sensitive issues. This chapter focuses on our game design concerning the struggle of Uganda, a design that allows players to experience the atrocities and inhumane conditions and, by illuminating such values as peace and justice, helps them more generally to appreciate the moral complexity of a humane intervention. Rather than theoretical constructs to be debated in the abstract, the ethical struggles involved in determining a humane intervention in the game setting are grounded in different Non-Player Characters' perspectives and operationalized within the underlying game dynamics. Beyond reporting on the designed game, the chapter draws the reader into the struggles of designing such an ethically contentious game.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDesigning Games for Ethics
Subtitle of host publicationModels, Techniques and Frameworks
PublisherIGI Global
Pages312-333
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9781609601201
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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