UC Davis XIPline ("zipline") end-station at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: Development and experimental results

S. R. Barberie, T. A. Cahill, C. F. Cahill, Thomas Cahill, C. R. Iceman, D. E. Barnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The X-ray fluorescence Induced by Polychromatic Beam end-station (XIPline, pronounced "zipline") began development and operation at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) in early 2012. The end-station is a collaboration of the University of California Davis, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the SSRL. Since its initial development, the end-station has been used as an element specific analytical tool for a variety of environmental, metallic, and mineral samples. Presented here are the motivations for development, the specifications of the beamline end-station, and two examples of recent experiments performed. Specifically we look at analysis of an aerosol deposited substrate to demonstrate the main purpose of this line and we also show our analysis of the recent Sutter's Mill Meteorite, an example of bulk sample analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)930-933
Number of pages4
JournalNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment
Volume729
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 7 2013

Keywords

  • Mill Meteorite XIPline
  • Non-destructive
  • Sutter's
  • Sychrotron radiation
  • X-ray fluorescence
  • XRF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics
  • Instrumentation

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