Two ships crossing: Hybrid poetics in the dream of the Rood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although the theological and aesthetic relevance of the term holmwudu ("sea-wood") in line 91 of The Dream of the Rood has been demonstrated, many editions and pedagogical texts still insert the emendation holtwudu ("forest-wood"). I argue against the emendation because holmwudu belongs to an ongoing characterization of the Holy Cross as a sea vessel that occurs throughout the body of the poem, not just after line 91. Moreover, I claim that The Dream of the Rood uses a modified version of the Sea Voyage type-scene in the talking cross's tale of the crucifixion. My reading of The Dream of the Rood shows the productive interplay of two poetic strategies: the literate and the oral traditional. The poem combines the Christian metaphor of navis crucis, drawn from patristic theology, and an oral-related type-scene, both of which portray the rood as the vehicle by which one may reach heaven.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-255
Number of pages15
JournalEnglish Studies
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Fingerprint

theology
edition
metaphor
aesthetics
Ship
Poetics
Emendation
Poem
Wood
Vessel
Voyager
Aesthetics
Theology
Crucifixion
Heaven
Patristics
Holy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

Two ships crossing : Hybrid poetics in the dream of the Rood. / Maring, Heather.

In: English Studies, Vol. 91, No. 3, 05.2010, p. 241-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e395af5ba5034feb9a39c12f2c52aaf2,
title = "Two ships crossing: Hybrid poetics in the dream of the Rood",
abstract = "Although the theological and aesthetic relevance of the term holmwudu ({"}sea-wood{"}) in line 91 of The Dream of the Rood has been demonstrated, many editions and pedagogical texts still insert the emendation holtwudu ({"}forest-wood{"}). I argue against the emendation because holmwudu belongs to an ongoing characterization of the Holy Cross as a sea vessel that occurs throughout the body of the poem, not just after line 91. Moreover, I claim that The Dream of the Rood uses a modified version of the Sea Voyage type-scene in the talking cross's tale of the crucifixion. My reading of The Dream of the Rood shows the productive interplay of two poetic strategies: the literate and the oral traditional. The poem combines the Christian metaphor of navis crucis, drawn from patristic theology, and an oral-related type-scene, both of which portray the rood as the vehicle by which one may reach heaven.",
author = "Heather Maring",
year = "2010",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1080/00138381003637583",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "91",
pages = "241--255",
journal = "English Studies",
issn = "0013-838X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Two ships crossing

T2 - Hybrid poetics in the dream of the Rood

AU - Maring, Heather

PY - 2010/5

Y1 - 2010/5

N2 - Although the theological and aesthetic relevance of the term holmwudu ("sea-wood") in line 91 of The Dream of the Rood has been demonstrated, many editions and pedagogical texts still insert the emendation holtwudu ("forest-wood"). I argue against the emendation because holmwudu belongs to an ongoing characterization of the Holy Cross as a sea vessel that occurs throughout the body of the poem, not just after line 91. Moreover, I claim that The Dream of the Rood uses a modified version of the Sea Voyage type-scene in the talking cross's tale of the crucifixion. My reading of The Dream of the Rood shows the productive interplay of two poetic strategies: the literate and the oral traditional. The poem combines the Christian metaphor of navis crucis, drawn from patristic theology, and an oral-related type-scene, both of which portray the rood as the vehicle by which one may reach heaven.

AB - Although the theological and aesthetic relevance of the term holmwudu ("sea-wood") in line 91 of The Dream of the Rood has been demonstrated, many editions and pedagogical texts still insert the emendation holtwudu ("forest-wood"). I argue against the emendation because holmwudu belongs to an ongoing characterization of the Holy Cross as a sea vessel that occurs throughout the body of the poem, not just after line 91. Moreover, I claim that The Dream of the Rood uses a modified version of the Sea Voyage type-scene in the talking cross's tale of the crucifixion. My reading of The Dream of the Rood shows the productive interplay of two poetic strategies: the literate and the oral traditional. The poem combines the Christian metaphor of navis crucis, drawn from patristic theology, and an oral-related type-scene, both of which portray the rood as the vehicle by which one may reach heaven.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951900613&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77951900613&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00138381003637583

DO - 10.1080/00138381003637583

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77951900613

VL - 91

SP - 241

EP - 255

JO - English Studies

JF - English Studies

SN - 0013-838X

IS - 3

ER -