Twenty-four-hour urinary thiamine as a biomarker for the assessment of thiamine intake

Natasha Tasevska, S. A. Runswick, A. McTaggart, S. A. Bingham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate 24-h urinary thiamine as a potential biomarker for thiamine intake for use in validation studies to assess the validity of dietary intake data collected by self-reporting dietary methods. Subjects: Seven male and six female healthy participants living for 30 days in a metabolic suite under strictly controlled conditions consuming their usual diet as assessed beforehand from four consecutive 7-day food diaries kept at home. During the 30-day study, all 24-h urine specimens were collected, validated for their completeness and analysed for thiamine. Results: Thirty-day mean (±s.d.) calculated thiamine intake was 2.22±0.55mg/day. Thirty-day mean (±s.d.) urinary excretion of thiamine was 526.5±193.0 μg/day (24.7±8.10% of intake). There was a highly significant correlation between individuals' 30-day means of thiamine intake and their mean excretion level (r=0.720; P=0.006), where 1mg of thiamine intake predicted 268.2 μg of thiamine in urine. The correlations between intake and excretion remained significant when measurement from a single 24-h urine collection was used (r=0.56). Conclusion: Twenty-four-hour urinary thiamine can be used as a concentration biomarker for thiamine intake in dietary validation studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1139-1147
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume62
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thiamine
thiamin
biomarkers
Biomarkers
urine
excretion
Validation Studies
food intake
Urine
Diet Records
Urine Specimen Collection
food records
Healthy Volunteers
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Twenty-four-hour urinary thiamine as a biomarker for the assessment of thiamine intake. / Tasevska, Natasha; Runswick, S. A.; McTaggart, A.; Bingham, S. A.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 62, No. 9, 2008, p. 1139-1147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tasevska, Natasha ; Runswick, S. A. ; McTaggart, A. ; Bingham, S. A. / Twenty-four-hour urinary thiamine as a biomarker for the assessment of thiamine intake. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 ; Vol. 62, No. 9. pp. 1139-1147.
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