Twelve testable hypotheses on the geobiology of weathering

S. L. Brantley, J. P. Megonigal, F. N. Scatena, Z. Balogh-Brunstad, R. T. Barnes, M. A. Bruns, P. Van Cappellen, K. Dontsova, Hilairy Hartnett, A. S. Hartshorn, Arjun Heimsath, E. Herndon, L. Jin, C. K. Keller, J. R. Leake, W. H. Mcdowell, F. C. Meinzer, T. J. Mozdzer, S. Petsch, J. Pett-Ridge & 7 others K. S. Pregitzer, P. A. Raymond, C. S. Riebe, K. Shumaker, A. Sutton-Grier, R. Walter, K. Yoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Critical Zone (CZ) research investigates the chemical, physical, and biological processes that modulate the Earth's surface. Here, we advance 12 hypotheses that must be tested to improve our understanding of the CZ: (1) Solar-to-chemical conversion of energy by plants regulates flows of carbon, water, and nutrients through plant-microbe soil networks, thereby controlling the location and extent of biological weathering. (2) Biological stoichiometry drives changes in mineral stoichiometry and distribution through weathering. (3) On landscapes experiencing little erosion, biology drives weathering during initial succession, whereas weathering drives biology over the long term.(4) In eroding landscapes, weathering-front advance at depth is coupled to surface denudation via biotic processes.(5) Biology shapes the topography of the Critical Zone.(6) The impact of climate forcing on denudation rates in natural systems can be predicted from models incorporating biogeochemical reaction rates and geomorphological transport laws.(7) Rising global temperatures will increase carbon losses from the Critical Zone.(8) Rising atmospheric PCO2 will increase rates and extents of mineral weathering in soils.(9) Riverine solute fluxes will respond to changes in climate primarily due to changes in water fluxes and secondarily through changes in biologically mediated weathering.(10) Land use change will impact Critical Zone processes and exports more than climate change. (11) In many severely altered settings, restoration of hydrological processes is possible in decades or less, whereas restoration of biodiversity and biogeochemical processes requires longer timescales.(12) Biogeochemical properties impart thresholds or tipping points beyond which rapid and irreversible losses of ecosystem health, function, and services can occur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-165
Number of pages26
JournalGeobiology
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

weathering
stoichiometry
denudation
Biological Sciences
biological weathering
climate change
soil weathering
minerals
energy conversion
climate forcing
carbon
ecosystem health
mineral
soil microorganisms
chemical process
biological processes
land use change
reaction rate
solutes
topography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Brantley, S. L., Megonigal, J. P., Scatena, F. N., Balogh-Brunstad, Z., Barnes, R. T., Bruns, M. A., ... Yoo, K. (2011). Twelve testable hypotheses on the geobiology of weathering. Geobiology, 9(2), 140-165. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1472-4669.2010.00264.x

Twelve testable hypotheses on the geobiology of weathering. / Brantley, S. L.; Megonigal, J. P.; Scatena, F. N.; Balogh-Brunstad, Z.; Barnes, R. T.; Bruns, M. A.; Van Cappellen, P.; Dontsova, K.; Hartnett, Hilairy; Hartshorn, A. S.; Heimsath, Arjun; Herndon, E.; Jin, L.; Keller, C. K.; Leake, J. R.; Mcdowell, W. H.; Meinzer, F. C.; Mozdzer, T. J.; Petsch, S.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Pregitzer, K. S.; Raymond, P. A.; Riebe, C. S.; Shumaker, K.; Sutton-Grier, A.; Walter, R.; Yoo, K.

In: Geobiology, Vol. 9, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 140-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brantley, SL, Megonigal, JP, Scatena, FN, Balogh-Brunstad, Z, Barnes, RT, Bruns, MA, Van Cappellen, P, Dontsova, K, Hartnett, H, Hartshorn, AS, Heimsath, A, Herndon, E, Jin, L, Keller, CK, Leake, JR, Mcdowell, WH, Meinzer, FC, Mozdzer, TJ, Petsch, S, Pett-Ridge, J, Pregitzer, KS, Raymond, PA, Riebe, CS, Shumaker, K, Sutton-Grier, A, Walter, R & Yoo, K 2011, 'Twelve testable hypotheses on the geobiology of weathering' Geobiology, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 140-165. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1472-4669.2010.00264.x
Brantley SL, Megonigal JP, Scatena FN, Balogh-Brunstad Z, Barnes RT, Bruns MA et al. Twelve testable hypotheses on the geobiology of weathering. Geobiology. 2011 Mar;9(2):140-165. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1472-4669.2010.00264.x
Brantley, S. L. ; Megonigal, J. P. ; Scatena, F. N. ; Balogh-Brunstad, Z. ; Barnes, R. T. ; Bruns, M. A. ; Van Cappellen, P. ; Dontsova, K. ; Hartnett, Hilairy ; Hartshorn, A. S. ; Heimsath, Arjun ; Herndon, E. ; Jin, L. ; Keller, C. K. ; Leake, J. R. ; Mcdowell, W. H. ; Meinzer, F. C. ; Mozdzer, T. J. ; Petsch, S. ; Pett-Ridge, J. ; Pregitzer, K. S. ; Raymond, P. A. ; Riebe, C. S. ; Shumaker, K. ; Sutton-Grier, A. ; Walter, R. ; Yoo, K. / Twelve testable hypotheses on the geobiology of weathering. In: Geobiology. 2011 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 140-165.
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