Tumour-immune dynamics with an immune checkpoint inhibitor

Elpiniki Nikolopoulou, Lauren R. Johnson, Duane Harris, John D. Nagy, Edward C. Stites, Yang Kuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of immune checkpoint inhibitors is becoming more commonplace in clinical trials across the nation. Two important factors in the tumour-immune response are the checkpoint protein programmed death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand PD-L1. We propose a mathematical tumour-immune model using a system of ordinary differential equations to study dynamics with and without the use of anti-PD-1. A sensitivity analysis is conducted, and series of simulations are performed to investigate the effects of intermittent and continuous treatments on the tumour-immune dynamics. We consider the system without the anti-PD-1 drug to conduct a mathematical analysis to determine the stability of the tumour-free and tumorous equilibria. Through simulations, we found that a normally functioning immune system may control tumour. We observe treatment with anti-PD-1 alone may not be sufficient to eradicate tumour cells. Therefore, it may be beneficial to combine single agent treatments with additional therapies to obtain a better antitumour response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S137-S159
JournalLetters in Biomathematics
Volume5
Issue numbersup1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 30 2018

Fingerprint

Checkpoint
Inhibitor
Tumors
Tumor
Neoplasms
Immune system
Immune Response
Immune System
Mathematical Analysis
System of Ordinary Differential Equations
Ordinary differential equations
Clinical Trials
Sensitivity analysis
Therapy
Sensitivity Analysis
Drugs
Simulation
Ligands
Cells
Sufficient

Keywords

  • anti-PD-1
  • checkpoint inhibitor
  • Immunotherapy
  • mathematical oncology
  • PD-1
  • PD-L1
  • tumour
  • tumour/immune model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Nikolopoulou, E., Johnson, L. R., Harris, D., Nagy, J. D., Stites, E. C., & Kuang, Y. (2018). Tumour-immune dynamics with an immune checkpoint inhibitor. Letters in Biomathematics, 5(sup1), S137-S159. https://doi.org/10.1080/23737867.2018.1440978

Tumour-immune dynamics with an immune checkpoint inhibitor. / Nikolopoulou, Elpiniki; Johnson, Lauren R.; Harris, Duane; Nagy, John D.; Stites, Edward C.; Kuang, Yang.

In: Letters in Biomathematics, Vol. 5, No. sup1, 30.06.2018, p. S137-S159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nikolopoulou, E, Johnson, LR, Harris, D, Nagy, JD, Stites, EC & Kuang, Y 2018, 'Tumour-immune dynamics with an immune checkpoint inhibitor', Letters in Biomathematics, vol. 5, no. sup1, pp. S137-S159. https://doi.org/10.1080/23737867.2018.1440978
Nikolopoulou E, Johnson LR, Harris D, Nagy JD, Stites EC, Kuang Y. Tumour-immune dynamics with an immune checkpoint inhibitor. Letters in Biomathematics. 2018 Jun 30;5(sup1):S137-S159. https://doi.org/10.1080/23737867.2018.1440978
Nikolopoulou, Elpiniki ; Johnson, Lauren R. ; Harris, Duane ; Nagy, John D. ; Stites, Edward C. ; Kuang, Yang. / Tumour-immune dynamics with an immune checkpoint inhibitor. In: Letters in Biomathematics. 2018 ; Vol. 5, No. sup1. pp. S137-S159.
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