Tumor necrosis factor, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin 1 production within sponge matrix allografts

Henri R. Ford, Rosemary A. Hoffman, Edward J. Wing, D. Mitchell Magee, Lori A. McIntyre, Richard L. Simmons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neither the presence nor the specific role of secretory cytokines in in vivo allograft rejection has been extensively studied. We quantitated the levels of colony-stimulating factors, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin 1 within the rejecting allograft. BALB/c (H-2d) mice were implanted with polyurethane sponges containing either allogeneic C57BL/6 (H-2b) or syngeneic splenocytes, or splenocyte-free media. At various days postgrafting, the sponges were harvested, and the cells infiltrating the grafts were analyzed for specific antidonor cytolytic activity, while IL-1, TNF, and CSF levels were measured in the graft exudate fluid. Allogeneic grafts had significantly higher concentrations of CSF, TNF, and IL-1 than syngeneic of spleno- cyte-free grafts. A specific radioimmunoassay revealed that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is the primary CSF produced in the grafts. Peak TNF levels preceded peak M-CSF and IL-1 levels, which coincided with the initial appearance of allospeeific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Maximal CTL activity was seen on day 13, when the levels of these cytokines had already begun to fall. Specific bioassays for multi-CSF (IL-3), granulocyte CSF, granulocyte-macrophage CSF, IL-2, and IL-4 failed to detect these cytokines in the sponge fluid at any time. We hypothesize that TNF, M- CSF, and IL-1 probably play regulatory roles in the immunologic events at the site of allograft challenge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)460-466
Number of pages7
JournalTransplantation
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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