Trust in branded autonomous vehicles & performance expectations: A theoretical framework

Natalie Celmer, Russell Branaghan, Erin Chiou

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Future autonomous vehicle systems will be diverse in design and functionality because they will be produced by different brands. It is possible these brand differences yield different levels of trust in the automation, therefore different expectations for vehicle performance. Perceptions of system safety, trustworthiness, and performance are important because they help users determine how reliant they can be on the system. Based on a review of the literature, the system's perceived intent, competence, method, and history could be differentiating factors. Importantly, these perceptions are based on both the automated technology and the brand's personality. The following theoretical framework reflects a Human Systems Engineering approach to consider how brand differences impact perceived trustworthiness, performance expectations and ultimate safety of autonomous vehicles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1761-1765
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781510889538
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2018Oct 5 2018

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume3
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period10/1/1810/5/18

Fingerprint

Vehicle performance
trustworthiness
Systems engineering
Security systems
performance
Automation
systems engineering
automation
functionality
personality
history
literature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Celmer, N., Branaghan, R., & Chiou, E. (2018). Trust in branded autonomous vehicles & performance expectations: A theoretical framework. In 62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018 (pp. 1761-1765). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 3). Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc..

Trust in branded autonomous vehicles & performance expectations : A theoretical framework. / Celmer, Natalie; Branaghan, Russell; Chiou, Erin.

62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc., 2018. p. 1761-1765 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 3).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Celmer, N, Branaghan, R & Chiou, E 2018, Trust in branded autonomous vehicles & performance expectations: A theoretical framework. in 62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, vol. 3, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc., pp. 1761-1765, 62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018, Philadelphia, United States, 10/1/18.
Celmer N, Branaghan R, Chiou E. Trust in branded autonomous vehicles & performance expectations: A theoretical framework. In 62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc. 2018. p. 1761-1765. (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).
Celmer, Natalie ; Branaghan, Russell ; Chiou, Erin. / Trust in branded autonomous vehicles & performance expectations : A theoretical framework. 62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc., 2018. pp. 1761-1765 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).
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