Tribal “remnants” or state citizens: Mississippi Choctaws in the post-removal South*

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper explores how the Mississippi Choctaws engaged state citizenship in the years immediately following removal. I challenge the standard narrative of Choctaws’ relationships with the Mississippi legal system as one in which they were primarily victimized by unscrupulous lawyers and state officials. I argue instead that Choctaws used their new status as citizens to fight back against dispossession. I also examine how ideals of masculinity and class conflicts shaped interpretations of rights and obligations between Indians and whites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-214
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Nineteenth Century History
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2016

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Masculinity
Ideal
Dispossession
Class Conflict
Legal System
Lawyers
Citizenship
Obligation

Keywords

  • Citizenship
  • masculinity
  • race
  • settler colonialism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History

Cite this

Tribal “remnants” or state citizens : Mississippi Choctaws in the post-removal South*. / Osburn, Katherine.

In: American Nineteenth Century History, Vol. 17, No. 2, 03.05.2016, p. 199-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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