Trends in downward solar radiation at the surface over north America from climate model projections and implications for solar energy

Gerardo Andres Saenz, Huei-Ping Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The projected changes in the downward solar radiation at the surface over North America for late 21st century are deduced from global climate model simulations with greenhouse-gas (GHG) forcing. A robust trend is found in winter over the United States, which exhibits a simple pattern of a decrease of sunlight over Northern USA. and an increase of sunlight over Southern USA. This structure was identified in both the seasonal mean and the mean climatology at different times of the day. It is broadly consistent with the known poleward shift of storm tracks in winter in climate model simulations with GHG forcing. The centennial trend of the downward shortwave radiation at the surface in Northern USA. is on the order of 10% of the climatological value for the January monthly mean, and slightly over 10% at the time when it is midday in the United States. This indicates a nonnegligible influence of the GHG forcing on solar energy in the long term. Nevertheless, when dividing the 10% by a century, in the near term, the impact of the GHG forcing is relatively minor such that the estimate of solar power potential using present-day climatology will remain useful in the coming decades.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number483679
JournalAdvances in Meteorology
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 5 2015

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Pollution
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this