Trees grow on money: Urban tree canopy cover and environmental justice

Kirsten Schwarz, Michail Fragkias, Christopher Boone, Weiqi Zhou, Melissa McHale, J. Morgan Grove, Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne, Joseph P. McFadden, Geoffrey L. Buckley, Daniel Childers, Laura Ogden, Stephanie Pincetl, Diane Pataki, Ali Whitmer, Mary L. Cadenasso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the distributional equity of urban tree canopy (UTC) cover for Baltimore, MD, Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Raleigh, NC, Sacramento, CA, and Washington, D.C. using high spatial resolution land cover data and census data. Data are analyzed at the Census Block Group levels using Spearman's correlation, ordinary least squares regression (OLS), and a spatial autoregressive model (SAR). Across all cities there is a strong positive correlation between UTC cover and median household income. Negative correlations between race and UTC cover exist in bivariate models for some cities, but they are generally not observed using multivariate regressions that include additional variables on income, education, and housing age. SAR models result in higher r-square values compared to the OLS models across all cities, suggesting that spatial autocorrelation is an important feature of our data. Similarities among cities can be found based on shared characteristics of climate, race/ethnicity, and size. Our findings suggest that a suite of variables, including income, contribute to the distribution of UTC cover. These findings can help target simultaneous strategies for UTC goals and environmental justice concerns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0122051
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Social Justice
canopy
Censuses
Least-Squares Analysis
least squares
income
Baltimore
Spatial Analysis
Los Angeles
District of Columbia
Climate
census data
household income
nationalities and ethnic groups
autocorrelation
land cover
Autocorrelation
education
Education
social justice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Schwarz, K., Fragkias, M., Boone, C., Zhou, W., McHale, M., Grove, J. M., ... Cadenasso, M. L. (2015). Trees grow on money: Urban tree canopy cover and environmental justice. PLoS One, 10(4), [e0122051]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122051

Trees grow on money : Urban tree canopy cover and environmental justice. / Schwarz, Kirsten; Fragkias, Michail; Boone, Christopher; Zhou, Weiqi; McHale, Melissa; Grove, J. Morgan; O'Neil-Dunne, Jarlath; McFadden, Joseph P.; Buckley, Geoffrey L.; Childers, Daniel; Ogden, Laura; Pincetl, Stephanie; Pataki, Diane; Whitmer, Ali; Cadenasso, Mary L.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 4, e0122051, 01.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwarz, K, Fragkias, M, Boone, C, Zhou, W, McHale, M, Grove, JM, O'Neil-Dunne, J, McFadden, JP, Buckley, GL, Childers, D, Ogden, L, Pincetl, S, Pataki, D, Whitmer, A & Cadenasso, ML 2015, 'Trees grow on money: Urban tree canopy cover and environmental justice', PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 4, e0122051. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122051
Schwarz K, Fragkias M, Boone C, Zhou W, McHale M, Grove JM et al. Trees grow on money: Urban tree canopy cover and environmental justice. PLoS One. 2015 Apr 1;10(4). e0122051. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122051
Schwarz, Kirsten ; Fragkias, Michail ; Boone, Christopher ; Zhou, Weiqi ; McHale, Melissa ; Grove, J. Morgan ; O'Neil-Dunne, Jarlath ; McFadden, Joseph P. ; Buckley, Geoffrey L. ; Childers, Daniel ; Ogden, Laura ; Pincetl, Stephanie ; Pataki, Diane ; Whitmer, Ali ; Cadenasso, Mary L. / Trees grow on money : Urban tree canopy cover and environmental justice. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 4.
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