Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Homeless Young Adults: The Importance of Victimization Experiences in Childhood and Once Homeless

Yeonwoo Kim, Kimberly Bender, Kristin Ferguson-Colvin, Stephanie Begun, Diana M. DiNitto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Homelessness itself is traumatic, and more than half of homeless young adults have also experienced abuse as children and/or victimization while homeless. These experiences increase the likelihood of developing trauma-related symptoms and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Few studies have, however, examined correlates of trauma and PTSD to identify targets for prevention and intervention. We used multinomial logistic regression to assess whether child abuse, victimization once homeless, features of homelessness (duration and transience), and personal resilience (self-efficacy and social connectedness) were associated with trauma and PTSD among 600 homeless young adults. Compared with those who had not experienced trauma, those who had were more likely to have been physically and/or sexually abused in childhood and physically victimized once homeless. Compared with those who had not experienced trauma, those who had experienced trauma and met criteria for PTSD were more likely to have been physically and/or sexually abused in childhood and physically and/or sexually victimized once homeless, and to have lower self-efficacy and social connectedness. Attention should be paid to these correlates of trauma and PTSD in developing and refining trauma-informed prevention and intervention approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-142
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

Crime Victims
posttraumatic stress disorder
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
victimization
young adult
trauma
Young Adult
childhood
Wounds and Injuries
experience
Homeless Persons
Child Abuse
Self Efficacy
homelessness
self-efficacy
abuse
resilience
Logistic Models
logistics
regression

Keywords

  • childhood abuse
  • homeless young adults
  • PTSD
  • trauma
  • victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Homeless Young Adults : The Importance of Victimization Experiences in Childhood and Once Homeless. / Kim, Yeonwoo; Bender, Kimberly; Ferguson-Colvin, Kristin; Begun, Stephanie; DiNitto, Diana M.

In: Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.09.2018, p. 131-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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