Translating oppression: Understanding how sexual minority status is associated with white men's racial attitudes

Sela Kleiman, Lisa Spanierman, Nathan Grant Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study comprised 3 interrelated purposes. First, the authors examined differences between White heterosexual (n = 97) and sexual minority (e.g., gay, bisexual, and queer; n = 83) men on various racial attitudes and empathy. Second, they examined whether highlighting oppressed identity status with an experimental prime could influence racial empathy. Third, the authors investigated whether sexual orientation disclosure and experiences with heterosexist discrimination among sexual minority men were associated with racial attitudes directly and indirectly through racial empathy. Key findings included: (a) sexual minority participants demonstrated more positive racial attitudes and empathy than heterosexual men; (b) there was no effect of prime on racial empathy; and (c) sexual orientation disclosure and experiences with heterosexism were associated significantly with positive racial attitudes indirectly through racial empathy. Implications for diversity education and future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)404-415
Number of pages12
JournalPsychology of Men and Masculinity
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Keywords

  • Heterosexism
  • Racial colorblindness
  • Racial empathy
  • White guilt
  • White privilege

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Gender Studies
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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