Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

George R. Ricker, Joshua N. Winn, Roland Vanderspek, David W. Latham, Gáspár Bakos, Jacob L. Bean, Zachory K. Berta-Thompson, Timothy M. Brown, Lars Buchhave, Nathaniel Butler, R. Paul Butler, William J. Chaplin, David Charbonneau, Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mark Clampin, Drake Deming, John Doty, Nathan De Lee, Courtney Dressing, Edward W. DunhamMichael Endl, Francois Fressin, Jian Ge, Thomas Henning, Matthew J. Holman, Andrew W. Howard, Shigeru Ida, Jon M. Jenkins, Garrett Jernigan, John Asher Johnson, Lisa Kaltenegger, Nobuyuki Kawai, Hans Kjeldsen, Gregory Laughlin, Alan M. Levine, Douglas Lin, Jack J. Lissauer, Phillip MacQueen, Geoffrey Marcy, Peter R. McCullough, Timothy D. Morton, Norio Narita, Martin Paegert, Enric Palle, Francesco Pepe, Joshua Pepper, Andreas Quirrenbach, Stephen A. Rinehart, Dimitar Sasselov, Bun'Ei Sato, Sara Seager, Alessandro Sozzetti, Keivan G. Stassun, Peter Sullivan, Andrew Szentgyorgyi, Guillermo Torres, Stephane Udry, Joel Villasenor

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

456 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search for planets transiting bright and nearby stars. TESS has been selected by NASA for launch in 2017 as an Astrophysics Explorer mission. The spacecraft will be placed into a highly elliptical 13.7-day orbit around the Earth. During its 2-year mission, TESS will employ four wide-field optical charge-coupled device cameras to monitor at least 200,000 main-sequence dwarf stars with IC≈4-13 for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. Each star will be observed for an interval ranging from 1 month to 1 year, depending mainly on the star's ecliptic latitude. The longest observing intervals will be for stars near the ecliptic poles, which are the optimal locations for follow-up observations with the James Webb Space Telescope. Brightness measurements of preselected target stars will be recorded every 2 min, and full frame images will be recorded every 30 min. TESS stars will be 10 to 100 times brighter than those surveyed by the pioneering Kepler mission. This will make TESS planets easier to characterize with follow-up observations. TESS is expected to find more than a thousand planets smaller than Neptune, including dozens that are comparable in size to the Earth. Public data releases will occur every 4 months, inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets. The TESS legacy will be a catalog of the nearest and brightest stars hosting transiting planets, which will endure as highly favorable targets for detailed investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number014003
JournalJournal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

extrasolar planets
Stars
Satellites
Planets
stars
planets
planet
ecliptic
brightness
Luminance
Kepler mission
intervals
Earth (planet)
dwarf stars
James Webb Space Telescope
Neptune (planet)
Neptune
main sequence stars
astrophysics
Astrophysics

Keywords

  • Exoplanet
  • extrasolar planet
  • photometry
  • satellite
  • transits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Instrumentation
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Ricker, G. R., Winn, J. N., Vanderspek, R., Latham, D. W., Bakos, G., Bean, J. L., ... Villasenor, J. (2015). Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems, 1(1), [014003]. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JATIS.1.1.014003

Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. / Ricker, George R.; Winn, Joshua N.; Vanderspek, Roland; Latham, David W.; Bakos, Gáspár; Bean, Jacob L.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Brown, Timothy M.; Buchhave, Lars; Butler, Nathaniel; Butler, R. Paul; Chaplin, William J.; Charbonneau, David; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Clampin, Mark; Deming, Drake; Doty, John; De Lee, Nathan; Dressing, Courtney; Dunham, Edward W.; Endl, Michael; Fressin, Francois; Ge, Jian; Henning, Thomas; Holman, Matthew J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Ida, Shigeru; Jenkins, Jon M.; Jernigan, Garrett; Johnson, John Asher; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kjeldsen, Hans; Laughlin, Gregory; Levine, Alan M.; Lin, Douglas; Lissauer, Jack J.; MacQueen, Phillip; Marcy, Geoffrey; McCullough, Peter R.; Morton, Timothy D.; Narita, Norio; Paegert, Martin; Palle, Enric; Pepe, Francesco; Pepper, Joshua; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Sato, Bun'Ei; Seager, Sara; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Stassun, Keivan G.; Sullivan, Peter; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Torres, Guillermo; Udry, Stephane; Villasenor, Joel.

In: Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems, Vol. 1, No. 1, 014003, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ricker, GR, Winn, JN, Vanderspek, R, Latham, DW, Bakos, G, Bean, JL, Berta-Thompson, ZK, Brown, TM, Buchhave, L, Butler, N, Butler, RP, Chaplin, WJ, Charbonneau, D, Christensen-Dalsgaard, J, Clampin, M, Deming, D, Doty, J, De Lee, N, Dressing, C, Dunham, EW, Endl, M, Fressin, F, Ge, J, Henning, T, Holman, MJ, Howard, AW, Ida, S, Jenkins, JM, Jernigan, G, Johnson, JA, Kaltenegger, L, Kawai, N, Kjeldsen, H, Laughlin, G, Levine, AM, Lin, D, Lissauer, JJ, MacQueen, P, Marcy, G, McCullough, PR, Morton, TD, Narita, N, Paegert, M, Palle, E, Pepe, F, Pepper, J, Quirrenbach, A, Rinehart, SA, Sasselov, D, Sato, BE, Seager, S, Sozzetti, A, Stassun, KG, Sullivan, P, Szentgyorgyi, A, Torres, G, Udry, S & Villasenor, J 2015, 'Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite', Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems, vol. 1, no. 1, 014003. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JATIS.1.1.014003
Ricker GR, Winn JN, Vanderspek R, Latham DW, Bakos G, Bean JL et al. Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems. 2015 Jan 1;1(1). 014003. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JATIS.1.1.014003
Ricker, George R. ; Winn, Joshua N. ; Vanderspek, Roland ; Latham, David W. ; Bakos, Gáspár ; Bean, Jacob L. ; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K. ; Brown, Timothy M. ; Buchhave, Lars ; Butler, Nathaniel ; Butler, R. Paul ; Chaplin, William J. ; Charbonneau, David ; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen ; Clampin, Mark ; Deming, Drake ; Doty, John ; De Lee, Nathan ; Dressing, Courtney ; Dunham, Edward W. ; Endl, Michael ; Fressin, Francois ; Ge, Jian ; Henning, Thomas ; Holman, Matthew J. ; Howard, Andrew W. ; Ida, Shigeru ; Jenkins, Jon M. ; Jernigan, Garrett ; Johnson, John Asher ; Kaltenegger, Lisa ; Kawai, Nobuyuki ; Kjeldsen, Hans ; Laughlin, Gregory ; Levine, Alan M. ; Lin, Douglas ; Lissauer, Jack J. ; MacQueen, Phillip ; Marcy, Geoffrey ; McCullough, Peter R. ; Morton, Timothy D. ; Narita, Norio ; Paegert, Martin ; Palle, Enric ; Pepe, Francesco ; Pepper, Joshua ; Quirrenbach, Andreas ; Rinehart, Stephen A. ; Sasselov, Dimitar ; Sato, Bun'Ei ; Seager, Sara ; Sozzetti, Alessandro ; Stassun, Keivan G. ; Sullivan, Peter ; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew ; Torres, Guillermo ; Udry, Stephane ; Villasenor, Joel. / Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. In: Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems. 2015 ; Vol. 1, No. 1.
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abstract = "The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search for planets transiting bright and nearby stars. TESS has been selected by NASA for launch in 2017 as an Astrophysics Explorer mission. The spacecraft will be placed into a highly elliptical 13.7-day orbit around the Earth. During its 2-year mission, TESS will employ four wide-field optical charge-coupled device cameras to monitor at least 200,000 main-sequence dwarf stars with IC≈4-13 for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. Each star will be observed for an interval ranging from 1 month to 1 year, depending mainly on the star's ecliptic latitude. The longest observing intervals will be for stars near the ecliptic poles, which are the optimal locations for follow-up observations with the James Webb Space Telescope. Brightness measurements of preselected target stars will be recorded every 2 min, and full frame images will be recorded every 30 min. TESS stars will be 10 to 100 times brighter than those surveyed by the pioneering Kepler mission. This will make TESS planets easier to characterize with follow-up observations. TESS is expected to find more than a thousand planets smaller than Neptune, including dozens that are comparable in size to the Earth. Public data releases will occur every 4 months, inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets. The TESS legacy will be a catalog of the nearest and brightest stars hosting transiting planets, which will endure as highly favorable targets for detailed investigations.",
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