Transfer of Immunity from Mother to Offspring Is Mediated via Egg-Yolk Protein Vitellogenin

Heli Salmela, Gro Amdam, Dalial Freitak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Insect immune systems can recognize specific pathogens and prime offspring immunity. High specificity of immune priming can be achieved when insect females transfer immune elicitors into developing oocytes. The molecular mechanism behind this transfer has been a mystery. Here, we establish that the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin is the carrier of immune elicitors. Using the honey bee, Apis mellifera, model system, we demonstrate with microscopy and western blotting that vitellogenin binds to bacteria, both Paenibacillus larvae – the gram-positive bacterium causing American foulbrood disease – and to Escherichia coli that represents gram-negative bacteria. Next, we verify that vitellogenin binds to pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan and zymosan, using surface plasmon resonance. We document that vitellogenin is required for transport of cell-wall pieces of E. coli into eggs by imaging tissue sections. These experiments identify vitellogenin, which is distributed widely in oviparous species, as the carrier of immune-priming signals. This work reveals a molecular explanation for trans-generational immunity in insects and a previously undescribed role for vitellogenin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1005015
JournalPLoS Pathogens
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Vitellogenins
Egg Proteins
Immunity
Insects
Bees
Oviparity
Escherichia coli
Zymosan
Honey
Surface Plasmon Resonance
Peptidoglycan
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Cell Wall
Eggs
Oocytes
Lipopolysaccharides
Microscopy
Immune System
Western Blotting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Immunology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Transfer of Immunity from Mother to Offspring Is Mediated via Egg-Yolk Protein Vitellogenin. / Salmela, Heli; Amdam, Gro; Freitak, Dalial.

In: PLoS Pathogens, Vol. 11, No. 7, e1005015, 01.07.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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