Transfer experience for upper division engineering and computer science students

Mary R. Anderson-Rowland

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since 2002 an academic scholarship success and professional development program has been held at Arizona State University for transfer and non-transfer students supported by National Science Foundation CSEM and S-STEM grants for scholars in engineering and computer science. These academic programs have grown to a two-credit hour class which now includes many students in addition to the scholarship students, especially transfers. In Fall 2007, there were a total of 25 transfer students in the program; in Fall 2010, 61 transfers; and in Fall 2012, 133 transfer students. The growth has largely been due to the word-of-mouth done by the students who attend the class and advertise how much the class has helped them This study attempts to measure if the type of transfer student in the program is the same from 2007 to 2010 to 2012 in spite of changes in the group size and in the program. This paper will primarily compare the 2007, 2010, and 2012 groups with data from a similar survey. Transfer program students in these groups were asked to identify basic demographics, family commitments before and after transfer, the number of hours worked before and after transfer, the amount of time spent commuting to school, when they knew they would enroll in a community college, why they chose their first college school, and when they knew they would attend a 4-year college or university. The results of the Fall 2012 study are analyzed by gender and compared with the results of Fall 2010 and Fall 2007 to look for trends. Most of the results between groups are consistent, but there are some statistically significant changes which we need to consider in order to continually improve our transfer program. A continuing challenge is to recruit more female transfer students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - 2013
Event120th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Jun 23 2013Jun 26 2013

Other

Other120th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period6/23/136/26/13

Fingerprint

Computer science
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Anderson-Rowland, M. R. (2013). Transfer experience for upper division engineering and computer science students. In ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings

Transfer experience for upper division engineering and computer science students. / Anderson-Rowland, Mary R.

ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. 2013.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Anderson-Rowland, MR 2013, Transfer experience for upper division engineering and computer science students. in ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. 120th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Atlanta, GA, United States, 6/23/13.
Anderson-Rowland MR. Transfer experience for upper division engineering and computer science students. In ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. 2013
Anderson-Rowland, Mary R. / Transfer experience for upper division engineering and computer science students. ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. 2013.
@inproceedings{84429c1086be4b68bff77996ca2c6875,
title = "Transfer experience for upper division engineering and computer science students",
abstract = "Since 2002 an academic scholarship success and professional development program has been held at Arizona State University for transfer and non-transfer students supported by National Science Foundation CSEM and S-STEM grants for scholars in engineering and computer science. These academic programs have grown to a two-credit hour class which now includes many students in addition to the scholarship students, especially transfers. In Fall 2007, there were a total of 25 transfer students in the program; in Fall 2010, 61 transfers; and in Fall 2012, 133 transfer students. The growth has largely been due to the word-of-mouth done by the students who attend the class and advertise how much the class has helped them This study attempts to measure if the type of transfer student in the program is the same from 2007 to 2010 to 2012 in spite of changes in the group size and in the program. This paper will primarily compare the 2007, 2010, and 2012 groups with data from a similar survey. Transfer program students in these groups were asked to identify basic demographics, family commitments before and after transfer, the number of hours worked before and after transfer, the amount of time spent commuting to school, when they knew they would enroll in a community college, why they chose their first college school, and when they knew they would attend a 4-year college or university. The results of the Fall 2012 study are analyzed by gender and compared with the results of Fall 2010 and Fall 2007 to look for trends. Most of the results between groups are consistent, but there are some statistically significant changes which we need to consider in order to continually improve our transfer program. A continuing challenge is to recruit more female transfer students.",
author = "Anderson-Rowland, {Mary R.}",
year = "2013",
language = "English (US)",
booktitle = "ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Transfer experience for upper division engineering and computer science students

AU - Anderson-Rowland, Mary R.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Since 2002 an academic scholarship success and professional development program has been held at Arizona State University for transfer and non-transfer students supported by National Science Foundation CSEM and S-STEM grants for scholars in engineering and computer science. These academic programs have grown to a two-credit hour class which now includes many students in addition to the scholarship students, especially transfers. In Fall 2007, there were a total of 25 transfer students in the program; in Fall 2010, 61 transfers; and in Fall 2012, 133 transfer students. The growth has largely been due to the word-of-mouth done by the students who attend the class and advertise how much the class has helped them This study attempts to measure if the type of transfer student in the program is the same from 2007 to 2010 to 2012 in spite of changes in the group size and in the program. This paper will primarily compare the 2007, 2010, and 2012 groups with data from a similar survey. Transfer program students in these groups were asked to identify basic demographics, family commitments before and after transfer, the number of hours worked before and after transfer, the amount of time spent commuting to school, when they knew they would enroll in a community college, why they chose their first college school, and when they knew they would attend a 4-year college or university. The results of the Fall 2012 study are analyzed by gender and compared with the results of Fall 2010 and Fall 2007 to look for trends. Most of the results between groups are consistent, but there are some statistically significant changes which we need to consider in order to continually improve our transfer program. A continuing challenge is to recruit more female transfer students.

AB - Since 2002 an academic scholarship success and professional development program has been held at Arizona State University for transfer and non-transfer students supported by National Science Foundation CSEM and S-STEM grants for scholars in engineering and computer science. These academic programs have grown to a two-credit hour class which now includes many students in addition to the scholarship students, especially transfers. In Fall 2007, there were a total of 25 transfer students in the program; in Fall 2010, 61 transfers; and in Fall 2012, 133 transfer students. The growth has largely been due to the word-of-mouth done by the students who attend the class and advertise how much the class has helped them This study attempts to measure if the type of transfer student in the program is the same from 2007 to 2010 to 2012 in spite of changes in the group size and in the program. This paper will primarily compare the 2007, 2010, and 2012 groups with data from a similar survey. Transfer program students in these groups were asked to identify basic demographics, family commitments before and after transfer, the number of hours worked before and after transfer, the amount of time spent commuting to school, when they knew they would enroll in a community college, why they chose their first college school, and when they knew they would attend a 4-year college or university. The results of the Fall 2012 study are analyzed by gender and compared with the results of Fall 2010 and Fall 2007 to look for trends. Most of the results between groups are consistent, but there are some statistically significant changes which we need to consider in order to continually improve our transfer program. A continuing challenge is to recruit more female transfer students.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84884341509&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84884341509&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

BT - ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings

ER -