Transdisciplinarity and sustainability science: A response to Sakao and Brambila-Macias in the context of sustainable cities research

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a recent Volume of this journal, authors Sakao and Brambila-Macias ask if we “share an understanding of transdisciplinarity in environmental sustainability research?”. This response to their timely question argues that while transdisciplinarity is highly desirable, the accepted goal of incorporating multiple stakeholders in research projects (T2) may be problematic due to the heterogeneity that this introduces. This challenge is explored in two case studies taken from sustainable urbanism research, one focused on green gentrification, the other upon urban food production. The paper concludes with an endorsement of a sequential program of T1 and T2 research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)238-245
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cleaner Production
Volume210
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 10 2019

Fingerprint

Sustainable development
sustainability
gentrification
food production
stakeholder
city
science
Sustainability science
Transdisciplinarity
Multiple stakeholders
Endorsements
Environmental sustainability
Gentrification
Food production
research project
programme

Keywords

  • Gentrification
  • Stakeholders
  • Sustainable urbanism
  • Transdisciplinarity
  • Urban agriculture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Strategy and Management
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "In a recent Volume of this journal, authors Sakao and Brambila-Macias ask if we “share an understanding of transdisciplinarity in environmental sustainability research?”. This response to their timely question argues that while transdisciplinarity is highly desirable, the accepted goal of incorporating multiple stakeholders in research projects (T2) may be problematic due to the heterogeneity that this introduces. This challenge is explored in two case studies taken from sustainable urbanism research, one focused on green gentrification, the other upon urban food production. The paper concludes with an endorsement of a sequential program of T1 and T2 research.",
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