Trajectories of peer victimization and perceptions of the self and schoolmates: Precursors to internalizing and externalizing problems

Wendy Troop-Gordon, Gary Ladd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

169 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence indicates that peer victimization is predictive of later maladjustment, but the mechanisms by which harassment impairs development have yet to be identified. The objectives of this study were (a) to discern normative trends in peer victimization experiences and self- and peer perceptions during preadolescence and (b) to investigate associations between individual differences in these trajectories and changes in psychosocial adjustment. A sample of 381 children (196 girls; 185 boys) was followed longitudinally between the ages of 9 and 11 years. Latent growth curve analyses revealed that, although children's self-appraisals became increasingly positive during preadolescence, their appraisals of peers became more negative. Moreoyer, analyses supported the contention that self- and peer beliefs act as mechanisms through which victimization is related to psychological dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1072-1091
Number of pages20
JournalChild Development
Volume76
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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Crime Victims
Ego
victimization
Social Adjustment
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Individuality
Psychology
trend
Growth
evidence
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Trajectories of peer victimization and perceptions of the self and schoolmates : Precursors to internalizing and externalizing problems. / Troop-Gordon, Wendy; Ladd, Gary.

In: Child Development, Vol. 76, No. 5, 09.2005, p. 1072-1091.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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