Trajectories of Italian Children’s Peer Rejection: Associations with Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, Physical Attractiveness, and Adolescent Adjustment

Laura Di Giunta, Concetta Pastorelli, Eriona Thartori, Anna Silvia Bombi, Emma Baumgartner, Richard Fabes, Carol Martin, Craig K. Enders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present study, the predictors and outcomes associated with the trajectories of peer rejection were examined in a longitudinal sample of Italian children (338 boys, 269 girls) ages 10 to 14 years. Follow-up assessments included 60% of the original sample at age 16–17. Low, medium, and high rejection trajectory groups were identified using growth mixture models. Consistent with previous studies, we found that (a) being less prosocial and more physically aggressive at age 10 was characteristic of those children with the high rejection trajectory; (b) being less attractive was related to higher peer rejection from age 10 to 14; and (c) boys with a high rejection trajectory showed high levels of delinquency and anxiety-depression and low levels of academic aspiration at age 16–17, whereas girls with a high rejection trajectory showed low levels of academic aspiration and social competence at age 16–17. Our findings indicate the detrimental consequences of peer rejection on children’s development and adjustment and shed light on the mechanisms that contribute to maintaining or worsening (e.g., being attractive, prosocial, and aggressive) a child’s negative status (e.g., being rejected) within his or her peer group over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 8 2017

Fingerprint

Social Adjustment
Aggression
Peer Group
Rejection (Psychology)
Anxiety
Depression
Growth

Keywords

  • Growth mixture modeling
  • Peer rejection
  • Physical aggression
  • Physical attractiveness
  • Prosocial behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Trajectories of Italian Children’s Peer Rejection : Associations with Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, Physical Attractiveness, and Adolescent Adjustment. / Di Giunta, Laura; Pastorelli, Concetta; Thartori, Eriona; Bombi, Anna Silvia; Baumgartner, Emma; Fabes, Richard; Martin, Carol; Enders, Craig K.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 08.12.2017, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d165c64e285a43e2bc3ceeb3b216e5c0,
title = "Trajectories of Italian Children’s Peer Rejection: Associations with Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, Physical Attractiveness, and Adolescent Adjustment",
abstract = "In the present study, the predictors and outcomes associated with the trajectories of peer rejection were examined in a longitudinal sample of Italian children (338 boys, 269 girls) ages 10 to 14 years. Follow-up assessments included 60{\%} of the original sample at age 16–17. Low, medium, and high rejection trajectory groups were identified using growth mixture models. Consistent with previous studies, we found that (a) being less prosocial and more physically aggressive at age 10 was characteristic of those children with the high rejection trajectory; (b) being less attractive was related to higher peer rejection from age 10 to 14; and (c) boys with a high rejection trajectory showed high levels of delinquency and anxiety-depression and low levels of academic aspiration at age 16–17, whereas girls with a high rejection trajectory showed low levels of academic aspiration and social competence at age 16–17. Our findings indicate the detrimental consequences of peer rejection on children’s development and adjustment and shed light on the mechanisms that contribute to maintaining or worsening (e.g., being attractive, prosocial, and aggressive) a child’s negative status (e.g., being rejected) within his or her peer group over time.",
keywords = "Growth mixture modeling, Peer rejection, Physical aggression, Physical attractiveness, Prosocial behavior",
author = "{Di Giunta}, Laura and Concetta Pastorelli and Eriona Thartori and Bombi, {Anna Silvia} and Emma Baumgartner and Richard Fabes and Carol Martin and Enders, {Craig K.}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s10802-017-0373-7",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--15",
journal = "Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology",
issn = "0091-0627",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trajectories of Italian Children’s Peer Rejection

T2 - Associations with Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, Physical Attractiveness, and Adolescent Adjustment

AU - Di Giunta, Laura

AU - Pastorelli, Concetta

AU - Thartori, Eriona

AU - Bombi, Anna Silvia

AU - Baumgartner, Emma

AU - Fabes, Richard

AU - Martin, Carol

AU - Enders, Craig K.

PY - 2017/12/8

Y1 - 2017/12/8

N2 - In the present study, the predictors and outcomes associated with the trajectories of peer rejection were examined in a longitudinal sample of Italian children (338 boys, 269 girls) ages 10 to 14 years. Follow-up assessments included 60% of the original sample at age 16–17. Low, medium, and high rejection trajectory groups were identified using growth mixture models. Consistent with previous studies, we found that (a) being less prosocial and more physically aggressive at age 10 was characteristic of those children with the high rejection trajectory; (b) being less attractive was related to higher peer rejection from age 10 to 14; and (c) boys with a high rejection trajectory showed high levels of delinquency and anxiety-depression and low levels of academic aspiration at age 16–17, whereas girls with a high rejection trajectory showed low levels of academic aspiration and social competence at age 16–17. Our findings indicate the detrimental consequences of peer rejection on children’s development and adjustment and shed light on the mechanisms that contribute to maintaining or worsening (e.g., being attractive, prosocial, and aggressive) a child’s negative status (e.g., being rejected) within his or her peer group over time.

AB - In the present study, the predictors and outcomes associated with the trajectories of peer rejection were examined in a longitudinal sample of Italian children (338 boys, 269 girls) ages 10 to 14 years. Follow-up assessments included 60% of the original sample at age 16–17. Low, medium, and high rejection trajectory groups were identified using growth mixture models. Consistent with previous studies, we found that (a) being less prosocial and more physically aggressive at age 10 was characteristic of those children with the high rejection trajectory; (b) being less attractive was related to higher peer rejection from age 10 to 14; and (c) boys with a high rejection trajectory showed high levels of delinquency and anxiety-depression and low levels of academic aspiration at age 16–17, whereas girls with a high rejection trajectory showed low levels of academic aspiration and social competence at age 16–17. Our findings indicate the detrimental consequences of peer rejection on children’s development and adjustment and shed light on the mechanisms that contribute to maintaining or worsening (e.g., being attractive, prosocial, and aggressive) a child’s negative status (e.g., being rejected) within his or her peer group over time.

KW - Growth mixture modeling

KW - Peer rejection

KW - Physical aggression

KW - Physical attractiveness

KW - Prosocial behavior

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85037369564&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85037369564&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10802-017-0373-7

DO - 10.1007/s10802-017-0373-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 29218645

AN - SCOPUS:85037369564

SP - 1

EP - 15

JO - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

JF - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

SN - 0091-0627

ER -