Training adaptive teams

Jamie C. Gorman, Nancy Cooke, Polemnia Amazeen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We report an experiment in which three training approaches are compared with the goal of training adaptive teams. Background: Cross-training is an established method in which team members are trained with the goal of building shared knowledge. Perturbation training is a new method in which team interactions are constrained to provide new coordination experiences during task acquisition. These two approaches, and a more traditional procedural approach, are compared. Method: Assigned to three training conditions were 26 teams. Teams flew nine simulated uninhabited air vehicle missions; three were critical tests of the teams ability to adapt to novel situations. Team performance, response time to novel events, and shared knowledge were measured. Results: Perturbation-trained teams significantly outperformed teams in the other conditions in two out of three critical test missions. Cross-training resulted in significant increases in shared teamwork knowledge and highest mean performance in one critical test. Procedural training led to the least adaptive teams. Conclusion: Perturbation training allows teams to match coordination variability during training to demands for coordination variability during posttraining performance. Although cross-training has adaptive benefits, it is suggested that process-oriented approaches, such as perturbation training, can lead to more adaptive teams. Application: Perturbation training is amenable to simulation-based training, where perturbations provide interaction experiences that teams can transfer to novel, real-world situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-307
Number of pages13
JournalHuman Factors
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

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Air
Aptitude
Experiments
Reaction Time
performance
teamwork
interaction
experience
air
Simulation Training
simulation
event
experiment
ability

Keywords

  • adaptive teams
  • coordination
  • coordination variability
  • cross-training
  • interaction experience
  • novel situations
  • perturbation training
  • practice condition variability
  • procedural training
  • process-oriented training
  • shared knowledge
  • task acquisition
  • team cognition
  • team coordination
  • team training
  • Uninhabited Air Vehicle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Applied Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Training adaptive teams. / Gorman, Jamie C.; Cooke, Nancy; Amazeen, Polemnia.

In: Human Factors, Vol. 52, No. 2, 04.2010, p. 295-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gorman, Jamie C. ; Cooke, Nancy ; Amazeen, Polemnia. / Training adaptive teams. In: Human Factors. 2010 ; Vol. 52, No. 2. pp. 295-307.
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