"Trafficking" parenting: Migration, motherhood, forced labor and deportability in the United Arab Emirates (UAE)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to look at how parenthood can often place or keep migrant women in situations of force, fraud, or coercion that characterize human trafficking; and, second, to look at how becoming a parent (or the possibility of reproducing) while in the host country structures a discourse and series of actions that can lead migrant women into trafficking-like situations of becoming undocumented and illegal, being detained, abused, or deported. Drawing on four years of ethnographic research in the UAE between 2007 and 2011, I contrast women's experiences of parenthood while in Dubai and Abu Dhabi with conversations and discourses constructed about migrant women's bodies, reproductive capabilities, and sexualities. Beyond looking at the question of intimate labor, I aim to look at the intimate lives of those engaging in intimate labor, asking: what of the personal, affective, and emotional ties of those working in spheres of intimate labor?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-194
Number of pages22
JournalMiddle East Law and Governance
Volume5
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

forced labor
United Arab Emirates
motherhood
migration
migrant
parenthood
labor
Persian Gulf
discourse
fraud
sexuality
parents
conversation
Motherhood
Forced Labor
Parenting
Labor
Migrants
experience
Parenthood

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Migrant worker
  • Motherhood
  • Parenting
  • Reproduction
  • UAE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

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