Traditional gender roles and substance-use behaviors, attitudes, exposure, and resistance among early adolescents in large cities of Mexico

Stephen Kulis, Flavio Marsiglia, Bertha L. Nuño-Gutiérrez, María Dolores Lozano, María Elena Medina-Mora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the associations between traditional gender roles (TGRs) and substance use among early adolescents in Mexico’s largest cities. The sample of seventh grade students (n = 4,932) attended 26 public schools in Mexico City, Guadalajara, or Monterrey in 2014. Outcomes included recent alcohol, binge drinking, cigarette and marijuana use, and lifetime poly-substance use; substance-use intentions, norms, attitudes, and expectancies; and substance-use exposure (peer use, offers) and resistance (refusal confidence, refusal skills, and decision-making skills). A TGR scale assessed endorsement of a polarized gender division of family labor and power. As hypothesized, among males, TGRs were consistently associated with poorer outcomes, and this association was usually stronger for males than for females. In contrast, among females there was no evidence that TGRs were associated with desirable outcomes. Contrary to expectations, TGRs predicted poorer outcomes for both females and males, and to equivalent degrees, for binge drinking, cigarette use, positive substance-use expectancies, and friends’ approval of substance use, and they predicted poorer outcomes for females but not for males on parental disapproval of substance use and drug-resistance skills. Interpretations highlight the persisting aspects of TGRs in the family and conflicting messages for females as Mexico undergoes changes in its gender order.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Substance Use
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 30 2017

Keywords

  • Mexican adolescents
  • Substance use
  • traditional gender roles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

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