Abstract

The development of connected health devices has allowed for a more accurate assessment of a person’s state under free-living conditions. In this work, we use two mobile sensing devices and investigate the correlation between individual’s resting metabolic rate (RMR) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) exposure levels. A total of 17 healthy, young, and sedentary office workers were recruited, measured for RMR with a mobile indirect calorimetry (IC) device, and compared with their corresponding predicted RMR values from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ recommended epidemiological equation, the Mifflin–St Jeor equation (MSJE). Individual differences in the RMR values from the IC device and the epidemiological equation were found, and the subjects’ RMRs were classified as normal, high, or low based on a cut-off of _200 kcal/day difference with respect to the predicted value. To study the cause of the difference, VOCs exposure levels of each participant’s daytime working environment and nighttime resting environment were assessed using a second mobile sensing device for VOCs exposure detection. The results showed that all sedentary office workers had a low VOCs exposure level (<2 ppmC), and there was no obvious correlation between VOCs exposure and the RMR difference. However, an additional participant who was a worker in an auto repair shop, showed high VOCs exposure with respect to the sedentary office worker population and a significant difference between measured and predicted RMR, with a low RMR of 500 kcal/day difference. The mobile sensing devices have been demonstrated to be suitable for the assessment of direct information of human health–environment interactions at free-living conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2670
JournalSensors (Switzerland)
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 14 2018

Fingerprint

Basal Metabolism
Volatile Organic Compounds
Volatile organic compounds
volatile organic compounds
health
Health
Equipment and Supplies
interactions
Indirect Calorimetry
Calorimetry
Social Conditions
heat measurement
nutrition
shops
Nutrition
Dietetics
Nutritive Value
daytime
Individuality
Repair

Keywords

  • Environmental exposure
  • Mobile sensors
  • Resting metabolic rate (RMR)
  • Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biochemistry
  • Instrumentation
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Tracking personal health-environment interaction with novel mobile sensing devices. / Deng, Yue; Liu, Nai Yuan; Tsow, Francis; Xian, Xiaojun; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Tao, Nongjian; Forzani, Erica.

In: Sensors (Switzerland), Vol. 18, No. 8, 2670, 14.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ea181983f00d4ec4b817a6ecc00d87ce,
title = "Tracking personal health-environment interaction with novel mobile sensing devices",
abstract = "The development of connected health devices has allowed for a more accurate assessment of a person’s state under free-living conditions. In this work, we use two mobile sensing devices and investigate the correlation between individual’s resting metabolic rate (RMR) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) exposure levels. A total of 17 healthy, young, and sedentary office workers were recruited, measured for RMR with a mobile indirect calorimetry (IC) device, and compared with their corresponding predicted RMR values from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ recommended epidemiological equation, the Mifflin–St Jeor equation (MSJE). Individual differences in the RMR values from the IC device and the epidemiological equation were found, and the subjects’ RMRs were classified as normal, high, or low based on a cut-off of _200 kcal/day difference with respect to the predicted value. To study the cause of the difference, VOCs exposure levels of each participant’s daytime working environment and nighttime resting environment were assessed using a second mobile sensing device for VOCs exposure detection. The results showed that all sedentary office workers had a low VOCs exposure level (<2 ppmC), and there was no obvious correlation between VOCs exposure and the RMR difference. However, an additional participant who was a worker in an auto repair shop, showed high VOCs exposure with respect to the sedentary office worker population and a significant difference between measured and predicted RMR, with a low RMR of 500 kcal/day difference. The mobile sensing devices have been demonstrated to be suitable for the assessment of direct information of human health–environment interactions at free-living conditions.",
keywords = "Environmental exposure, Mobile sensors, Resting metabolic rate (RMR), Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)",
author = "Yue Deng and Liu, {Nai Yuan} and Francis Tsow and Xiaojun Xian and Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown and Nongjian Tao and Erica Forzani",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "14",
doi = "10.3390/s18082670",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
journal = "Sensors (Switzerland)",
issn = "1424-8220",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tracking personal health-environment interaction with novel mobile sensing devices

AU - Deng, Yue

AU - Liu, Nai Yuan

AU - Tsow, Francis

AU - Xian, Xiaojun

AU - Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

AU - Tao, Nongjian

AU - Forzani, Erica

PY - 2018/8/14

Y1 - 2018/8/14

N2 - The development of connected health devices has allowed for a more accurate assessment of a person’s state under free-living conditions. In this work, we use two mobile sensing devices and investigate the correlation between individual’s resting metabolic rate (RMR) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) exposure levels. A total of 17 healthy, young, and sedentary office workers were recruited, measured for RMR with a mobile indirect calorimetry (IC) device, and compared with their corresponding predicted RMR values from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ recommended epidemiological equation, the Mifflin–St Jeor equation (MSJE). Individual differences in the RMR values from the IC device and the epidemiological equation were found, and the subjects’ RMRs were classified as normal, high, or low based on a cut-off of _200 kcal/day difference with respect to the predicted value. To study the cause of the difference, VOCs exposure levels of each participant’s daytime working environment and nighttime resting environment were assessed using a second mobile sensing device for VOCs exposure detection. The results showed that all sedentary office workers had a low VOCs exposure level (<2 ppmC), and there was no obvious correlation between VOCs exposure and the RMR difference. However, an additional participant who was a worker in an auto repair shop, showed high VOCs exposure with respect to the sedentary office worker population and a significant difference between measured and predicted RMR, with a low RMR of 500 kcal/day difference. The mobile sensing devices have been demonstrated to be suitable for the assessment of direct information of human health–environment interactions at free-living conditions.

AB - The development of connected health devices has allowed for a more accurate assessment of a person’s state under free-living conditions. In this work, we use two mobile sensing devices and investigate the correlation between individual’s resting metabolic rate (RMR) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) exposure levels. A total of 17 healthy, young, and sedentary office workers were recruited, measured for RMR with a mobile indirect calorimetry (IC) device, and compared with their corresponding predicted RMR values from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ recommended epidemiological equation, the Mifflin–St Jeor equation (MSJE). Individual differences in the RMR values from the IC device and the epidemiological equation were found, and the subjects’ RMRs were classified as normal, high, or low based on a cut-off of _200 kcal/day difference with respect to the predicted value. To study the cause of the difference, VOCs exposure levels of each participant’s daytime working environment and nighttime resting environment were assessed using a second mobile sensing device for VOCs exposure detection. The results showed that all sedentary office workers had a low VOCs exposure level (<2 ppmC), and there was no obvious correlation between VOCs exposure and the RMR difference. However, an additional participant who was a worker in an auto repair shop, showed high VOCs exposure with respect to the sedentary office worker population and a significant difference between measured and predicted RMR, with a low RMR of 500 kcal/day difference. The mobile sensing devices have been demonstrated to be suitable for the assessment of direct information of human health–environment interactions at free-living conditions.

KW - Environmental exposure

KW - Mobile sensors

KW - Resting metabolic rate (RMR)

KW - Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052128341&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85052128341&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/s18082670

DO - 10.3390/s18082670

M3 - Article

C2 - 30110932

AN - SCOPUS:85052128341

VL - 18

JO - Sensors (Switzerland)

JF - Sensors (Switzerland)

SN - 1424-8220

IS - 8

M1 - 2670

ER -