Tracer study of mixing and transport in the upper Hudson River with multiple dams

Theodore Caplow, Peter Schlosser, David T. Ho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In October 2001, ∼0.2 mol of SF6 was injected into the upper Hudson River, a modified natural channel with multiple dams, at Ft. Edward, N.Y. The tracer was monitored for 7 days as it moved ∼50 km downriver. The longitudinal evolution of the tracer distribution was used to estimate one-dimensional advection (9.0±0.2 km d -1) and dispersion (17.3±4.0 m2 s -1) along the river axis. Comparison of these results to tracer studies on channels without dams suggests that dams reduce longitudinal dispersion below the value expected in a natural channel with the same discharge. SF6 loss through air-water gas exchange along the river and at two dams (10.7 m combined height) was estimated by observing decay in peak concentration. Losses at dams (approximately 50% per dam) were dominant. The estimated gas exchange at dams was compared to a simple model adapted from those available in literature. Small amounts of tracer were trapped in a canal segment (∼5 km long) that parallels the river, where advection and dispersion were sharply reduced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1498-1506
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Environmental Engineering
Volume130
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dams
dam
Rivers
tracer
river
Advection
gas exchange
advection
Gases
Canals
Discharge (fluid mechanics)
canal
Water
air
Air

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

Tracer study of mixing and transport in the upper Hudson River with multiple dams. / Caplow, Theodore; Schlosser, Peter; Ho, David T.

In: Journal of Environmental Engineering, Vol. 130, No. 12, 01.12.2004, p. 1498-1506.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{09d5a72a51734b248868d3bc0b1c188c,
title = "Tracer study of mixing and transport in the upper Hudson River with multiple dams",
abstract = "In October 2001, ∼0.2 mol of SF6 was injected into the upper Hudson River, a modified natural channel with multiple dams, at Ft. Edward, N.Y. The tracer was monitored for 7 days as it moved ∼50 km downriver. The longitudinal evolution of the tracer distribution was used to estimate one-dimensional advection (9.0±0.2 km d -1) and dispersion (17.3±4.0 m2 s -1) along the river axis. Comparison of these results to tracer studies on channels without dams suggests that dams reduce longitudinal dispersion below the value expected in a natural channel with the same discharge. SF6 loss through air-water gas exchange along the river and at two dams (10.7 m combined height) was estimated by observing decay in peak concentration. Losses at dams (approximately 50{\%} per dam) were dominant. The estimated gas exchange at dams was compared to a simple model adapted from those available in literature. Small amounts of tracer were trapped in a canal segment (∼5 km long) that parallels the river, where advection and dispersion were sharply reduced.",
author = "Theodore Caplow and Peter Schlosser and Ho, {David T.}",
year = "2004",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2004)130:12(1498)",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "130",
pages = "1498--1506",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Engineering, ASCE",
issn = "0733-9372",
publisher = "American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tracer study of mixing and transport in the upper Hudson River with multiple dams

AU - Caplow, Theodore

AU - Schlosser, Peter

AU - Ho, David T.

PY - 2004/12/1

Y1 - 2004/12/1

N2 - In October 2001, ∼0.2 mol of SF6 was injected into the upper Hudson River, a modified natural channel with multiple dams, at Ft. Edward, N.Y. The tracer was monitored for 7 days as it moved ∼50 km downriver. The longitudinal evolution of the tracer distribution was used to estimate one-dimensional advection (9.0±0.2 km d -1) and dispersion (17.3±4.0 m2 s -1) along the river axis. Comparison of these results to tracer studies on channels without dams suggests that dams reduce longitudinal dispersion below the value expected in a natural channel with the same discharge. SF6 loss through air-water gas exchange along the river and at two dams (10.7 m combined height) was estimated by observing decay in peak concentration. Losses at dams (approximately 50% per dam) were dominant. The estimated gas exchange at dams was compared to a simple model adapted from those available in literature. Small amounts of tracer were trapped in a canal segment (∼5 km long) that parallels the river, where advection and dispersion were sharply reduced.

AB - In October 2001, ∼0.2 mol of SF6 was injected into the upper Hudson River, a modified natural channel with multiple dams, at Ft. Edward, N.Y. The tracer was monitored for 7 days as it moved ∼50 km downriver. The longitudinal evolution of the tracer distribution was used to estimate one-dimensional advection (9.0±0.2 km d -1) and dispersion (17.3±4.0 m2 s -1) along the river axis. Comparison of these results to tracer studies on channels without dams suggests that dams reduce longitudinal dispersion below the value expected in a natural channel with the same discharge. SF6 loss through air-water gas exchange along the river and at two dams (10.7 m combined height) was estimated by observing decay in peak concentration. Losses at dams (approximately 50% per dam) were dominant. The estimated gas exchange at dams was compared to a simple model adapted from those available in literature. Small amounts of tracer were trapped in a canal segment (∼5 km long) that parallels the river, where advection and dispersion were sharply reduced.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=10344252806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=10344252806&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2004)130:12(1498)

DO - 10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2004)130:12(1498)

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:10344252806

VL - 130

SP - 1498

EP - 1506

JO - Journal of Environmental Engineering, ASCE

JF - Journal of Environmental Engineering, ASCE

SN - 0733-9372

IS - 12

ER -