Towards more digital cities? Change in technology use and perceptions across small and medium-sized US cities

Mary K. Feeney, Federica Fusi, Leonor Camarena, Fengxiu Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is continuous pressure on public managers to adopt information and communication technologies (ICTs) to transform the way cities work. E-government research provides insights on the institutional, organisational, and individual factors that shape technology adoption and use. Yet most studies on small and medium sized cities use cross-sectional data or rely on small samples. We lack a systematic understanding of how technology use in smaller cities has changed over time and where these cities are lagging. Drawing from a multi-year, multi-method national study of city government technology use, we describe advancements and gaps in the enactment of a range of technologies, from social media to open data portals, and explore variation across city population, department type, and manager age. Our findings show that smaller cities still lag in the adoption of key features while local government managers are more inclined to adopt and positively perceive social media than traditional ICTs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)820-845
Number of pages26
JournalLocal Government Studies
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2020

Keywords

  • E-government
  • Twitter
  • local government
  • open government
  • social media

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

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