Toward inherently secure and resilient societies

Braden Allenby, Jonathan Fink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

182 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent years have seen a number of challenges to social stability and order, ranging from terrorist attacks and natural disasters to epidemics such as AIDS and SARS. Such challenges have generated specific policy responses, such as enhanced security at transportation hubs and planned deployment of a global tsunami detection network. However, the range of challenges and the practical impossibility of adequately addressing each in turn argue for adoption of a more comprehensive systems perspective. This should be based on the principle of enhancing social and economic resiliency as well as meeting security and emergency response needs and, to the extent possible, developing and implementing dual-use technologies that offer societal benefits even if anticipated disasters never occur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1034-1036
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume309
Issue number5737
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 12 2005

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Disasters
Tsunamis
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Emergencies
Economics
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Toward inherently secure and resilient societies. / Allenby, Braden; Fink, Jonathan.

In: Science, Vol. 309, No. 5737, 12.08.2005, p. 1034-1036.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allenby, Braden ; Fink, Jonathan. / Toward inherently secure and resilient societies. In: Science. 2005 ; Vol. 309, No. 5737. pp. 1034-1036.
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