Toward a Wonderland of comparative education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The publication of Noah & Eckstein's Toward a Science of Comparative Education (1969, Macmillan, NY) marked the beginning of an increasingly narrow research trajectory in comparative education, claiming a universality for Western knowledge and privileging scientific rationality in research. Juxtaposing the ‘science’ to Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’, such comparative education relegated more-than-human worlds and spiritual domains of learning–and being–to our collective pasts, personal childhood memories, or imaginations. How can we reorient and attune ourselves toward a Wonder(land), rather than a Science of comparative education exclusively, opening spaces for multiple ways of making sense of the world, and multiple ways of being? How can we reanimate our capacity toengage with a more-than-human world? Based on the analysis of children’s literature and textbooks published during various historical periods in Latvia, this article follows the white rabbit to reexamine taken-for-granted dichotomies–nature and culture, time and space, self and other–by bringing the ‘pagan’ worldviews or nature-centred spiritualities more clearly into focus, while reimagining education and childhood beyond the Western horizon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalComparative Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

comparative education
science
childhood
Latvia
worldview
spirituality
rationality
textbook
education

Keywords

  • childhood
  • comparative education
  • nature-centred spiritualities
  • ontology
  • paganism
  • space
  • time
  • Wonderland

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Toward a Wonderland of comparative education. / Silova, Iveta.

In: Comparative Education, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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