Toward a fundamental understanding of worked example instruction

Impact of means-ends practice, backward/forward fading, and adaptivity

Roxana Moreno, Martin Reisslein, Geethani Mayanthi Delgoda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has demonstrated that worked example based instructional designs can effectively foster learning of engineering concepts and are supported by contemporary educational theories, including cognitive load theory. However, a number of interrelated fundamental questions, which have neither been addressed in the educational psychology nor in the engineering education literature, remain open including: (A) What is the impact of means-ends practice? (B) What is the effect of backward vs. forward fading of worked example steps? and (C) What is the effect of adaptivity to learner performance? The goal of the present study was to answer these questions by comparing the learning and perceptions about learning of engineering college freshman who learned how to solve electrical circuit problems in five different computer-based learning conditions: (1) problem solving with step-by-step feedback, (2) means-ends problem solving with total feedback, (3) backward fading, (4) forward fading, and (5) adaptive feedback. Forward fading and adaptive feedback practice promoted more students' near problem solving transfer ability than backward fading practice. Furthermore, the adaptive feedback practice group outperformed students in the backward fading practice group on measures of far problem solving transfer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Event36th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 28 2006Oct 31 2006

Other

Other36th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period10/28/0610/31/06

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Students
Engineering education
Networks (circuits)

Keywords

  • Adaptivity
  • Cognitive load
  • Electrical circuit analysis
  • Fading
  • Problem solving
  • Worked examples

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Toward a fundamental understanding of worked example instruction : Impact of means-ends practice, backward/forward fading, and adaptivity. / Moreno, Roxana; Reisslein, Martin; Delgoda, Geethani Mayanthi.

Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. 2006. 4116999.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Moreno, R, Reisslein, M & Delgoda, GM 2006, Toward a fundamental understanding of worked example instruction: Impact of means-ends practice, backward/forward fading, and adaptivity. in Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE., 4116999, 36th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE, San Diego, CA, United States, 10/28/06. https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2006.322285
Moreno, Roxana ; Reisslein, Martin ; Delgoda, Geethani Mayanthi. / Toward a fundamental understanding of worked example instruction : Impact of means-ends practice, backward/forward fading, and adaptivity. Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. 2006.
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