Too Close for Comfort? Investigating the Nature and Functioning of Work and Non-work Role Segmentation Preferences

Jessica R. Methot, Jeffery LePine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We examine the bi-directional nature of role segmentation preferences—preferences to protect the home domain from work intrusions, and to protect the work domain from home intrusions—and hypothesize that the dimensions independently prompt individuals to manage their boundaries in ways that complement their preferences. Design and Methodological Approach: In a series of three studies, we investigate whether segmentation preferences vary on two dimensions, how they reflect enactive and proactive boundary management, and their association with domain-specific satisfaction and performance. Findings: In Study 1 (field design, n = 314), we confirmed that segmentation preferences comprise two distinct dimensions, and individuals experience fewer intrusions into the domain they desired to protect. In Study 2 (experimental design, n = 1253), we found that participants who prefer to protect their home domain are less inclined to accept jobs in scenarios where their significant other is employed in the same organization, and participants who prefer to protect their work domain are less inclined to initiate a romantic relationship in scenarios that involve a coworker. In Study 3 (field design, n = 65), we found that individuals who prefer to protect their work or home domain report greater satisfaction with the preferred domain, and whereas the preference to protect the work domain is not associated with higher supervisor ratings of job performance, preference to protect the home domain is associated with higher significant-other ratings of non-work performance. Implications: Understanding employees’ proclivities to blur boundaries can inform recruitment and selection of employees to anticipate organizational fit, diagnose sources of misfit, structure individualized policies to ameliorate employee strain, and decrease turnover costs. Originality/Value: This synthesis provides a unique investigation of segmentation preference dimensions’ differential functioning and reinforces the validity of the role segmentation preferences concept.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-123
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Business and Psychology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Research Design
Functioning
Segmentation
Organizations
Costs and Cost Analysis
Employees
Scenarios
Rating
Work Performance
Experimental design
Turnover costs
Supervisors
Recruitment and selection
Job performance
Boundary management

Keywords

  • Boundary management
  • Boundary permeability
  • Job acceptance
  • Role segmentation preferences
  • Work-life balance
  • Workplace romance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Too Close for Comfort? Investigating the Nature and Functioning of Work and Non-work Role Segmentation Preferences. / Methot, Jessica R.; LePine, Jeffery.

In: Journal of Business and Psychology, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 103-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{117f465f99d64f85999fd399a69dca84,
title = "Too Close for Comfort? Investigating the Nature and Functioning of Work and Non-work Role Segmentation Preferences",
abstract = "Purpose: We examine the bi-directional nature of role segmentation preferences—preferences to protect the home domain from work intrusions, and to protect the work domain from home intrusions—and hypothesize that the dimensions independently prompt individuals to manage their boundaries in ways that complement their preferences. Design and Methodological Approach: In a series of three studies, we investigate whether segmentation preferences vary on two dimensions, how they reflect enactive and proactive boundary management, and their association with domain-specific satisfaction and performance. Findings: In Study 1 (field design, n = 314), we confirmed that segmentation preferences comprise two distinct dimensions, and individuals experience fewer intrusions into the domain they desired to protect. In Study 2 (experimental design, n = 1253), we found that participants who prefer to protect their home domain are less inclined to accept jobs in scenarios where their significant other is employed in the same organization, and participants who prefer to protect their work domain are less inclined to initiate a romantic relationship in scenarios that involve a coworker. In Study 3 (field design, n = 65), we found that individuals who prefer to protect their work or home domain report greater satisfaction with the preferred domain, and whereas the preference to protect the work domain is not associated with higher supervisor ratings of job performance, preference to protect the home domain is associated with higher significant-other ratings of non-work performance. Implications: Understanding employees’ proclivities to blur boundaries can inform recruitment and selection of employees to anticipate organizational fit, diagnose sources of misfit, structure individualized policies to ameliorate employee strain, and decrease turnover costs. Originality/Value: This synthesis provides a unique investigation of segmentation preference dimensions’ differential functioning and reinforces the validity of the role segmentation preferences concept.",
keywords = "Boundary management, Boundary permeability, Job acceptance, Role segmentation preferences, Work-life balance, Workplace romance",
author = "Methot, {Jessica R.} and Jeffery LePine",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10869-015-9402-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "103--123",
journal = "Journal of Business and Psychology",
issn = "0889-3268",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic/Human Sciences Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Too Close for Comfort? Investigating the Nature and Functioning of Work and Non-work Role Segmentation Preferences

AU - Methot, Jessica R.

AU - LePine, Jeffery

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - Purpose: We examine the bi-directional nature of role segmentation preferences—preferences to protect the home domain from work intrusions, and to protect the work domain from home intrusions—and hypothesize that the dimensions independently prompt individuals to manage their boundaries in ways that complement their preferences. Design and Methodological Approach: In a series of three studies, we investigate whether segmentation preferences vary on two dimensions, how they reflect enactive and proactive boundary management, and their association with domain-specific satisfaction and performance. Findings: In Study 1 (field design, n = 314), we confirmed that segmentation preferences comprise two distinct dimensions, and individuals experience fewer intrusions into the domain they desired to protect. In Study 2 (experimental design, n = 1253), we found that participants who prefer to protect their home domain are less inclined to accept jobs in scenarios where their significant other is employed in the same organization, and participants who prefer to protect their work domain are less inclined to initiate a romantic relationship in scenarios that involve a coworker. In Study 3 (field design, n = 65), we found that individuals who prefer to protect their work or home domain report greater satisfaction with the preferred domain, and whereas the preference to protect the work domain is not associated with higher supervisor ratings of job performance, preference to protect the home domain is associated with higher significant-other ratings of non-work performance. Implications: Understanding employees’ proclivities to blur boundaries can inform recruitment and selection of employees to anticipate organizational fit, diagnose sources of misfit, structure individualized policies to ameliorate employee strain, and decrease turnover costs. Originality/Value: This synthesis provides a unique investigation of segmentation preference dimensions’ differential functioning and reinforces the validity of the role segmentation preferences concept.

AB - Purpose: We examine the bi-directional nature of role segmentation preferences—preferences to protect the home domain from work intrusions, and to protect the work domain from home intrusions—and hypothesize that the dimensions independently prompt individuals to manage their boundaries in ways that complement their preferences. Design and Methodological Approach: In a series of three studies, we investigate whether segmentation preferences vary on two dimensions, how they reflect enactive and proactive boundary management, and their association with domain-specific satisfaction and performance. Findings: In Study 1 (field design, n = 314), we confirmed that segmentation preferences comprise two distinct dimensions, and individuals experience fewer intrusions into the domain they desired to protect. In Study 2 (experimental design, n = 1253), we found that participants who prefer to protect their home domain are less inclined to accept jobs in scenarios where their significant other is employed in the same organization, and participants who prefer to protect their work domain are less inclined to initiate a romantic relationship in scenarios that involve a coworker. In Study 3 (field design, n = 65), we found that individuals who prefer to protect their work or home domain report greater satisfaction with the preferred domain, and whereas the preference to protect the work domain is not associated with higher supervisor ratings of job performance, preference to protect the home domain is associated with higher significant-other ratings of non-work performance. Implications: Understanding employees’ proclivities to blur boundaries can inform recruitment and selection of employees to anticipate organizational fit, diagnose sources of misfit, structure individualized policies to ameliorate employee strain, and decrease turnover costs. Originality/Value: This synthesis provides a unique investigation of segmentation preference dimensions’ differential functioning and reinforces the validity of the role segmentation preferences concept.

KW - Boundary management

KW - Boundary permeability

KW - Job acceptance

KW - Role segmentation preferences

KW - Work-life balance

KW - Workplace romance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84958039422&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84958039422&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10869-015-9402-0

DO - 10.1007/s10869-015-9402-0

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 103

EP - 123

JO - Journal of Business and Psychology

JF - Journal of Business and Psychology

SN - 0889-3268

IS - 1

ER -