Tolerance-maps for line-profiles constructed from Boolean operations on primitive T-map elements

Y. He, J. K. Davidson, Jami J. Shah

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For purposes of automating the assignment of tolerances during design, a math model, called the Tolerance-Map (T-Map), has been produced for most of the tolerance classes that are used by designers. Each T-Map is a hypothetical point-space that represents the geometric variations of a feature in its tolerance-zone. Of the six tolerance classes defined in the ASME/ANSI/ISO Standards, only one attempt has been made at modeling line-profiles [1], and the method used is an intuitive kinematic description of the allowable displacements of the middle-sized profile within its tolerance-zone. The objective of this paper is to describe an alternative method of construction, one that is much more amenable to computer automation, to obtain the T-Map of any line-profile. Tolerances on line-profiles are used to control cross-sectional shapes of parts, even mildly twisted ones such as those on turbine or compressor blades. Such tolerances limit geometric manufacturing variations to a specified two dimensional tolerance-zone, i.e. an area, the boundaries to which are curves parallel to the true profile. The single profile tolerance may be used to control position, orientation, and form of the profile. The new method requires decomposing a profile into segments, creating a solid-model T-Map primitive for each, and then combining these by the Boolean intersection to generate the T-Map for a complete line profile of any shape. To economize on length, the scope of this paper is limited to line-profiles having any polygonal shape.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers
Volume2 A
ISBN (Print)9780791855850
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
EventASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2013 - Portland, OR, United States
Duration: Aug 4 2013Aug 7 2013

Other

OtherASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2013
CountryUnited States
CityPortland, OR
Period8/4/138/7/13

Fingerprint

Boolean Operation
Tolerance
Line
Profile
Tolerance Limits
Position Control
Solid Model
Compressor
Turbine
Position control
Blade
Automation
Intuitive
Turbomachine blades
Kinematics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

He, Y., Davidson, J. K., & Shah, J. J. (2013). Tolerance-maps for line-profiles constructed from Boolean operations on primitive T-map elements. In Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference (Vol. 2 A). [V02AT02A003] American Society of Mechanical Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2013-12393

Tolerance-maps for line-profiles constructed from Boolean operations on primitive T-map elements. / He, Y.; Davidson, J. K.; Shah, Jami J.

Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 2 A American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2013. V02AT02A003.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

He, Y, Davidson, JK & Shah, JJ 2013, Tolerance-maps for line-profiles constructed from Boolean operations on primitive T-map elements. in Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. vol. 2 A, V02AT02A003, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASME 2013 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2013, Portland, OR, United States, 8/4/13. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2013-12393
He Y, Davidson JK, Shah JJ. Tolerance-maps for line-profiles constructed from Boolean operations on primitive T-map elements. In Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 2 A. American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 2013. V02AT02A003 https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2013-12393
He, Y. ; Davidson, J. K. ; Shah, Jami J. / Tolerance-maps for line-profiles constructed from Boolean operations on primitive T-map elements. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 2 A American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2013.
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