Thought self-leadership: The impact of mental strategies training on employee cognition, behavior, and affect

Christopher Neck, Charles C. Manz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

141 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thought self-leadership involves employee self-influence through cognitive strategies that focus on individual self-dialogue, mental imagery, beliefs and assumptions, and thought patterns. A training intervention-based field study with a control group was undertaken to empirically examine the applicability of thought self-leadership in an organizational setting (of bankruptcy financial status), and the potential for cognitions to be self-controlled. Results suggested that individuals who received the thought self-leadership training experienced increased mental performance, positive affect (enthusiasm), job satisfaction, and decreased negative affect (nervousness) relative to those not receiving the training. Additionally, the trainees reported a strong and positive reaction to the training. Finally, those who received the training experienced enhanced perceptions of self-efficacy and more optimistic perceptions of the organization's bankruptcy condition than those not receiving the training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-467
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bankruptcy
Cognition
cognition
employee
leadership
Job Satisfaction
bankruptcy
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Self Efficacy
Anxiety
Organizations
Control Groups
job satisfaction
trainee
self-efficacy
Employees
Self-leadership
dialogue
performance
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Thought self-leadership : The impact of mental strategies training on employee cognition, behavior, and affect. / Neck, Christopher; Manz, Charles C.

In: Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 17, No. 5, 09.1996, p. 445-467.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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