Those who have, receive: The matthew effect in early childhood intervention in the home environment

Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marinus H. Van Uzendoorn, Robert H. Bradley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

Are preventive early childhood interventions effective in improving home environments, as assessed with the HOME inventory (Caldwell & Bradley, 1984)? The authors traced 48 published articles, presenting 56 intervention effects (N = 7,350). The combined effect size on the HOME total score was d = 0.20 (p < .001). Randomized intervention studies were effective, but the combined effect size was limited (d = 0.13). Nonrandomized studies showed inflated effects (d = 0.58). Interventions with middle-class, non-adolescent parents showed higher effect.sizes than interventions with low-SES or adolescent samples. Effective interventions used a moderate number of sessions in a limited period and were home-based. Learning Materials, Involvement, and Responsivity showed significant intervention effects. Families in better living conditions profited more from parent education (the Matthew effect).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-26
Number of pages26
JournalReview of Educational Research
Volume75
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Home
  • Home environment
  • Intervention
  • Meta-analysis
  • Parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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