This is me

Hidden pedagogy in the television series, Transparent

Joseph D. Sweet, David Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper performs a case study of the hit television series, Transparent, and considers the public pedagogy (Burdick & Sandlin, 2013) the show produces. In order to do this, it conducts a discourse analysis (Gee, 2015, 2017) of two scenes that take place during the show’s first season. We conducted interviews with six members of the show’s creative team who identified these two scenes as germane to the pedagogical aspirations of the show, and they comprise the focus of the paper. Accordingly, the authors analyze both the scenes and excerpts from the interview transcripts to critically examine the ways in which the television show may teach its audience about gender, sexual fluidity and trans* subjectivities. The piece concludes with implications for how the show furthers the public Discourse regarding nonbinary, trans*, and gender creative individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Curriculum and Pedagogy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

television series
television show
gender
interview
discourse analysis
subjectivity
discourse

Keywords

  • discourse analysis
  • public pedagogy
  • trans*gender
  • transparent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

This is me : Hidden pedagogy in the television series, Transparent. / Sweet, Joseph D.; Carlson, David.

In: Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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