Third generation computer tutors: Learn from or ignore human tutors?

Albert Corbett, John Anderson, Art Graesser, Ken Koedinger, Kurt VanLehn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Current "second generation or "intelligent" computer tutors are approximately one-half as effective as human tutors. How will we develop the next generation of computer tutors that approaches human tutor effectiveness? Does success lie in understanding and emulating the performance of human tutors? If so, should we focus on natural language dialog or human tutor pedagogy? Alternatively, does computer technology afford effective instructional interventions, unavailable to human tutors? Can we modify learning activities and monitor student problem solving in ways that human tutors cannot.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Pages85-86
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes
EventConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 1999 - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: May 15 1999May 20 1999

Other

OtherConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 1999
CountryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period5/15/995/20/99

Keywords

  • Cognitive modeling
  • Education
  • Instructional design
  • Intelligent tutoring systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

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  • Cite this

    Corbett, A., Anderson, J., Graesser, A., Koedinger, K., & VanLehn, K. (1999). Third generation computer tutors: Learn from or ignore human tutors? In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings (pp. 85-86) https://doi.org/10.1145/632716.632769