"They're there for you": Men's relationships with companion animals

Christina Risley-Curtiss, Lynn Holley, Sulamita Kodiene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most people in the United States living with companion animals consider them family members (GfK Roper, 2009), however little is known about what this means. This study explores the beliefs about and experiences with companion animals of 12 men from various ethnic and social class groups, national origins, and geographic settings. Findings include that most men considered their pets to be members of the family, though not necessarily on a par with human members. Men's attitudes and relationships appeared to vary by race/ethnicity, social class, type of geographic community, and national origin. Implications are offered for social work practice and research so that social workers might develop more accurate assessments and effective interventions by taking these relationships into account.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-418
Number of pages7
JournalFamilies in Society
Volume92
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

animal
social class
family member
social worker
social work
ethnicity
community
experience
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

"They're there for you" : Men's relationships with companion animals. / Risley-Curtiss, Christina; Holley, Lynn; Kodiene, Sulamita.

In: Families in Society, Vol. 92, No. 4, 10.2011, p. 412-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Risley-Curtiss, Christina ; Holley, Lynn ; Kodiene, Sulamita. / "They're there for you" : Men's relationships with companion animals. In: Families in Society. 2011 ; Vol. 92, No. 4. pp. 412-418.
@article{0decce63e8a84eddaba99c9879538f39,
title = "{"}They're there for you{"}: Men's relationships with companion animals",
abstract = "Most people in the United States living with companion animals consider them family members (GfK Roper, 2009), however little is known about what this means. This study explores the beliefs about and experiences with companion animals of 12 men from various ethnic and social class groups, national origins, and geographic settings. Findings include that most men considered their pets to be members of the family, though not necessarily on a par with human members. Men's attitudes and relationships appeared to vary by race/ethnicity, social class, type of geographic community, and national origin. Implications are offered for social work practice and research so that social workers might develop more accurate assessments and effective interventions by taking these relationships into account.",
author = "Christina Risley-Curtiss and Lynn Holley and Sulamita Kodiene",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1606/1044-3894.4152",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "92",
pages = "412--418",
journal = "Journal of social casework",
issn = "1044-3894",
publisher = "Families International Inc",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - "They're there for you"

T2 - Men's relationships with companion animals

AU - Risley-Curtiss, Christina

AU - Holley, Lynn

AU - Kodiene, Sulamita

PY - 2011/10

Y1 - 2011/10

N2 - Most people in the United States living with companion animals consider them family members (GfK Roper, 2009), however little is known about what this means. This study explores the beliefs about and experiences with companion animals of 12 men from various ethnic and social class groups, national origins, and geographic settings. Findings include that most men considered their pets to be members of the family, though not necessarily on a par with human members. Men's attitudes and relationships appeared to vary by race/ethnicity, social class, type of geographic community, and national origin. Implications are offered for social work practice and research so that social workers might develop more accurate assessments and effective interventions by taking these relationships into account.

AB - Most people in the United States living with companion animals consider them family members (GfK Roper, 2009), however little is known about what this means. This study explores the beliefs about and experiences with companion animals of 12 men from various ethnic and social class groups, national origins, and geographic settings. Findings include that most men considered their pets to be members of the family, though not necessarily on a par with human members. Men's attitudes and relationships appeared to vary by race/ethnicity, social class, type of geographic community, and national origin. Implications are offered for social work practice and research so that social workers might develop more accurate assessments and effective interventions by taking these relationships into account.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862123523&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84862123523&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1606/1044-3894.4152

DO - 10.1606/1044-3894.4152

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84862123523

VL - 92

SP - 412

EP - 418

JO - Journal of social casework

JF - Journal of social casework

SN - 1044-3894

IS - 4

ER -