Thermodynamic analysis of biohydrogen and microbial fuel cells

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Three alternatives for converting organic wastes to energy: biohydrogen production, direct electricity production via microbial cells (MFC), and methane production were evaluated. Biohydrogen production, MFC, or a combination could triple the energy production from organic wastes, compared to methane production. Biohydrogen required increased hydrogen yield or a second process that utilizes the electrons present in the fermentation products; thus, efforts are best focused on optimizing the energy recovery from fermentative products. The MFC is the best option in terms of energy-production efficiency, as long as substrate conversion to electron flow at the anode is high. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 228th ACS National Meeting (Philadelphia, PA 8/22-26/2004).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
Volume228
Edition1
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
EventAbstracts of Papers - 228th ACS National Meeting - Philadelphia, PA, United States
Duration: Aug 22 2004Aug 26 2004

Other

OtherAbstracts of Papers - 228th ACS National Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia, PA
Period8/22/048/26/04

Fingerprint

Microbial fuel cells
Thermodynamics
Methane
Electrons
Fermentation
Hydrogen
Anodes
Electricity
Recovery
Substrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Rittmann, B., Torres, C., & Marcus, A. (2004). Thermodynamic analysis of biohydrogen and microbial fuel cells. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts (1 ed., Vol. 228)

Thermodynamic analysis of biohydrogen and microbial fuel cells. / Rittmann, Bruce; Torres, Cesar; Marcus, Andrew.

ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. Vol. 228 1. ed. 2004.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Rittmann, B, Torres, C & Marcus, A 2004, Thermodynamic analysis of biohydrogen and microbial fuel cells. in ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 1 edn, vol. 228, Abstracts of Papers - 228th ACS National Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 8/22/04.
Rittmann B, Torres C, Marcus A. Thermodynamic analysis of biohydrogen and microbial fuel cells. In ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts. 1 ed. Vol. 228. 2004
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