The Yalu River era of developing Asia

Japanese expertise, colonial power, and the construction of Sup'ung Dam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Through investigating the construction of one of Japan's largest infrastructure projects during the Sino-Japanese War (1937-45), this article examines the formation of a technocratic regime of colonial development expertise that was an important pillar of Japanese imperial rule and continued to have powerful effects throughout postwar Asia. It analyzes how a particular form of technical expertise and the wider discourse of Scientific Japan as the modernizer of Asia were legitimated and naturalized, as well as how they operated as a system of colonial power. Japan and other East Asian regimes after the war continued to invoke forms of technocratic expertise with origins in the colonial era as part of their state-led development programs, often with adverse effects on their populations. Thus this article concludes that there is a continuing need to critique, historicize, and denaturalize such regimes of expertise invoked by networks of bureaucrats, businessmen, engineers, and experts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-139
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Asian Studies
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

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colonial power
expertise
river
Japan
regime
businessman
engineer
expert
infrastructure
Asia
Expertise
Dams
Colonial Power
discourse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • History

Cite this

The Yalu River era of developing Asia : Japanese expertise, colonial power, and the construction of Sup'ung Dam. / Moore, Aaron.

In: Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 72, No. 1, 02.2013, p. 115-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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