The winding road to relapse: Forging a new understanding of cue-induced reinstatement models and their associated neural mechanisms

Mark D. Namba, Seven E. Tomek, Michael Olive, Joshua S. Beckmann, Cassandra Gipson-Reichardt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In drug addiction, cues previously associated with drug use can produce craving and frequently trigger the resumption of drug taking in individuals vulnerable to relapse. Environmental stimuli associated with drugs or natural reinforcers can become reliably conditioned to increase behavior that was previously reinforced. In preclinical models of addiction, these cues enhance both drug self-administration and reinstatement of drug seeking. In this review, we will dissociate the roles of conditioned stimuli as reinforcers from their modulatory or discriminative functions in producing drug-seeking behavior. As well, we will examine possible differences in neurobiological encoding underlying these functional differences. Specifically, we will discuss how models of drug addiction and relapse should more systematically evaluate these different types of stimuli to better understand the neurobiology underlying craving and relapse. In this way, behavioral and pharmacotherapeutic interventions may be better tailored to promote drug use cessation outcomes and long-term abstinence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number17
JournalFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 9 2018

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Conditioned stimulus
  • Discriminative stimulus
  • Neurobiology
  • Reinstatement
  • Relapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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