Abstract

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming increasingly popular, both for hobbyists and within the commercial, industrial, and military sectors. Approximately one million new UAVs have been registered in the United States, with the majority being recreational UAVs. This growth of UAV activity and their increasingly common public presence engenders a wide variety of opinions, perceptions, and concerns among individuals about UAVs, particularly concerning personal privacy. Drawing from the privacy and emerging technology literature, the purpose of this paper is to identify how individuals’ perceptions of privacy explain their attitudes on the use of UAVs and whether this aligns with what we would expect from an emerging technology. Utilizing Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) for survey delivery to 2,108 respondents we conducted a descriptive statistical analysis of response frequency and t-tests of group mean differences. The results suggest that individuals who use UAVs, maintain a familiarity with the capabilities of UAVs, and have a basic understanding of UAV regulations, are somewhat less concerned about the growing presence of UAVs as it relates to privacy than individuals who are generally unfamiliar with UAVs, their capabilities, and UAV regulations. Policy implications of these results are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-105
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Urban Technology
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019

Fingerprint

privacy
regulation
Turk
statistical analysis
Military
public
vehicle
familiarity
Group

Keywords

  • drone
  • emerging technology
  • privacy
  • regulation
  • UAV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urban Studies

Cite this

@article{225b705beae9401fbbdfd48d29438019,
title = "The View from Above: A Survey of the Public’s Perception of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Privacy",
abstract = "Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming increasingly popular, both for hobbyists and within the commercial, industrial, and military sectors. Approximately one million new UAVs have been registered in the United States, with the majority being recreational UAVs. This growth of UAV activity and their increasingly common public presence engenders a wide variety of opinions, perceptions, and concerns among individuals about UAVs, particularly concerning personal privacy. Drawing from the privacy and emerging technology literature, the purpose of this paper is to identify how individuals’ perceptions of privacy explain their attitudes on the use of UAVs and whether this aligns with what we would expect from an emerging technology. Utilizing Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) for survey delivery to 2,108 respondents we conducted a descriptive statistical analysis of response frequency and t-tests of group mean differences. The results suggest that individuals who use UAVs, maintain a familiarity with the capabilities of UAVs, and have a basic understanding of UAV regulations, are somewhat less concerned about the growing presence of UAVs as it relates to privacy than individuals who are generally unfamiliar with UAVs, their capabilities, and UAV regulations. Policy implications of these results are discussed.",
keywords = "drone, emerging technology, privacy, regulation, UAV",
author = "Nelson, {Jake R.} and Anthony Grubesic and Danielle Wallace and Alyssa Chamberlain",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/10630732.2018.1551106",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "83--105",
journal = "Journal of Urban Technology",
issn = "1063-0732",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The View from Above

T2 - A Survey of the Public’s Perception of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Privacy

AU - Nelson, Jake R.

AU - Grubesic, Anthony

AU - Wallace, Danielle

AU - Chamberlain, Alyssa

PY - 2019/1/2

Y1 - 2019/1/2

N2 - Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming increasingly popular, both for hobbyists and within the commercial, industrial, and military sectors. Approximately one million new UAVs have been registered in the United States, with the majority being recreational UAVs. This growth of UAV activity and their increasingly common public presence engenders a wide variety of opinions, perceptions, and concerns among individuals about UAVs, particularly concerning personal privacy. Drawing from the privacy and emerging technology literature, the purpose of this paper is to identify how individuals’ perceptions of privacy explain their attitudes on the use of UAVs and whether this aligns with what we would expect from an emerging technology. Utilizing Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) for survey delivery to 2,108 respondents we conducted a descriptive statistical analysis of response frequency and t-tests of group mean differences. The results suggest that individuals who use UAVs, maintain a familiarity with the capabilities of UAVs, and have a basic understanding of UAV regulations, are somewhat less concerned about the growing presence of UAVs as it relates to privacy than individuals who are generally unfamiliar with UAVs, their capabilities, and UAV regulations. Policy implications of these results are discussed.

AB - Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming increasingly popular, both for hobbyists and within the commercial, industrial, and military sectors. Approximately one million new UAVs have been registered in the United States, with the majority being recreational UAVs. This growth of UAV activity and their increasingly common public presence engenders a wide variety of opinions, perceptions, and concerns among individuals about UAVs, particularly concerning personal privacy. Drawing from the privacy and emerging technology literature, the purpose of this paper is to identify how individuals’ perceptions of privacy explain their attitudes on the use of UAVs and whether this aligns with what we would expect from an emerging technology. Utilizing Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) for survey delivery to 2,108 respondents we conducted a descriptive statistical analysis of response frequency and t-tests of group mean differences. The results suggest that individuals who use UAVs, maintain a familiarity with the capabilities of UAVs, and have a basic understanding of UAV regulations, are somewhat less concerned about the growing presence of UAVs as it relates to privacy than individuals who are generally unfamiliar with UAVs, their capabilities, and UAV regulations. Policy implications of these results are discussed.

KW - drone

KW - emerging technology

KW - privacy

KW - regulation

KW - UAV

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061034537&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061034537&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/10630732.2018.1551106

DO - 10.1080/10630732.2018.1551106

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 83

EP - 105

JO - Journal of Urban Technology

JF - Journal of Urban Technology

SN - 1063-0732

IS - 1

ER -