The validity of regulating blood lactate concentration during running by ratings of perceived exertion

Nancy M. Stoudemire, Laurie Wideman, Kimberly A. Pass, Christina L. Mcginnes, Glenn Gaesser, Arthur Weltman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined whether ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) observed during an incremental (response) protocol could be used to produce target blood [HLa] of 2.5 mM and 4.0 mM during a 30-min treadmill run at a constant RPE, RPE (15.3, 17.6 19.1), oxygen uptake (V̇O2) (3.31, 3.96, 4.00 l · min-1), velocity (V) (198, 218, 223 m · min-1), and heart rate (HR) (179, 185, 190 bpm) at blood [HLa] of 2.5 mM and 4.0 mM, and peak were determined for nine subjects (5 males, 4 females) during incremental exercise. Subjects then completed two 30-min runs at the RPE corresponding to blood [HLa] of 2.5 mM (RPE 2.5 mM) and 4.0 mM (RPE 4.0 mM) measured during the incremental protocol. For both 30-min runs, V̇O2 was not different from V̇O2 corresponding to either 2.5 or 4.0 mM blood [HLa] during the incremental test. During the 30-min run at RPE 2.5 mM: (a) only during minutes 25-30 was the blood [HLa] significantly different than 2.5 mM (3.2 ± 0.6 mM, P < 0.05) for the first 20 min HR was significantly lower than the HR at 2.5 mM during the incremental protocol, and (c) V did not differ from V at 2.5 mM during the incremental protocol. During the 30-min run at RPE 4.0 mM; (a) blood [HLa] was not significantly different from 4.0 mM, (b) HR at every time point was significantly lower than HR 40 mM during the incremental protocol, and (c) V was decreased over time by an average of 24.6 m · min-1 (P < 0.05). Because RPE from the response protocol was able to produce a blood [HLa] close to the criterion value during each 30-min run, we conclude that RPE is a valid tool for prescribing exercise intensities corresponding to blood [HLa] of 2.5 mM and 4.0 mM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-495
Number of pages6
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Lactic Acid
Heart Rate
Oxygen

Keywords

  • EXERCISE
  • EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION
  • LACTATE
  • RPE
  • THRESHOLD

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The validity of regulating blood lactate concentration during running by ratings of perceived exertion. / Stoudemire, Nancy M.; Wideman, Laurie; Pass, Kimberly A.; Mcginnes, Christina L.; Gaesser, Glenn; Weltman, Arthur.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 28, No. 4, 1996, p. 490-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stoudemire, Nancy M. ; Wideman, Laurie ; Pass, Kimberly A. ; Mcginnes, Christina L. ; Gaesser, Glenn ; Weltman, Arthur. / The validity of regulating blood lactate concentration during running by ratings of perceived exertion. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1996 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 490-495.
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AU - Gaesser, Glenn

AU - Weltman, Arthur

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