The use of strontium isotope analysis to investigate Tiwanaku migration and mortuary ritual in Bolivia and Peru

Kelly Knudson, T. D. Price, Jane Buikstra, D. E. Blom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

136 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Strontium isotope analysis is applied in South America for the first time in order to investigate residential mobility and mortuary ritual from AD 500 to 1000. While Tiwanaku-style artefacts are spread throughout Bolivia, southern Peru and northern Chile during this time, the nature of Tiwanaku influence in the region is much debated. Human skeletal remains from life site of Tiwanaku and the proposed Tiwanaku colony of Chen Chen have been analysed to test the hypothesis that Timanaku colonies, populated with inhabitants from Tiwanaku, existed in Peru. Strontium isotope analysis supports this hypothesis by demonstrating that non-local individuals are present at both sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-18
Number of pages14
JournalArchaeometry
Volume46
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bolivia
Peru
religious behavior
migration
Chile
inhabitant
artifact
Tiwanaku
Strontium Isotope Analysis
Mortuary Rituals
time
Colonies

Keywords

  • Andes
  • Archaeological chemistry
  • Isotope analysis
  • Middle horizon
  • Migration
  • Residential mobility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Archaeology

Cite this

The use of strontium isotope analysis to investigate Tiwanaku migration and mortuary ritual in Bolivia and Peru. / Knudson, Kelly; Price, T. D.; Buikstra, Jane; Blom, D. E.

In: Archaeometry, Vol. 46, No. 1, 02.2004, p. 5-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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