'The testimony must begin in the home': The life of Salvation and the remaking of homes in the East African revival in Southern Uganda, c. 1930-1955

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The late colonial era in Uganda was not an easy time to keep families intact. Colonial officials, missionaries, and concerned East Africans offered their diagnoses of the problems and prescriptions for responding to the dilemma. In this context, Balokole Anglican revivalists articulated new patterns and ideals of family life. These new patterns of family life were not uniform across Uganda or East Africa, but they did share common characteristics that were derived from the spiritual disciplines and religious beliefs of the Balokole revival. As such, this essay argues that the revival movement was not simply a new message of eternal salvation or primarily a form of dissent, but rather a means through which a group of African Christians sought to address quotidian domestic problems and concerns of late-colonial East Africa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-332
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Religion in Africa
Volume44
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 20 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Salvation
Colonies
Africa
Family Life
East Africa
Revival
Testimony
Uganda
Quotidian
Revivalist
Colonial Era
Missionaries
Ideal
Prescription
Eternal
Religious Beliefs
Dissent

Keywords

  • Ankole
  • colonialism
  • conversion
  • East African Revival
  • family
  • Uganda

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • History

Cite this

@article{a203c8b9188c48ee8ef5e941130dc447,
title = "'The testimony must begin in the home': The life of Salvation and the remaking of homes in the East African revival in Southern Uganda, c. 1930-1955",
abstract = "The late colonial era in Uganda was not an easy time to keep families intact. Colonial officials, missionaries, and concerned East Africans offered their diagnoses of the problems and prescriptions for responding to the dilemma. In this context, Balokole Anglican revivalists articulated new patterns and ideals of family life. These new patterns of family life were not uniform across Uganda or East Africa, but they did share common characteristics that were derived from the spiritual disciplines and religious beliefs of the Balokole revival. As such, this essay argues that the revival movement was not simply a new message of eternal salvation or primarily a form of dissent, but rather a means through which a group of African Christians sought to address quotidian domestic problems and concerns of late-colonial East Africa.",
keywords = "Ankole, colonialism, conversion, East African Revival, family, Uganda",
author = "Jason Bruner",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1163/15700666-12340021",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "309--332",
journal = "Journal of Religion in Africa",
issn = "0022-4200",
publisher = "Brill",
number = "3-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'The testimony must begin in the home'

T2 - The life of Salvation and the remaking of homes in the East African revival in Southern Uganda, c. 1930-1955

AU - Bruner, Jason

PY - 2014/3/20

Y1 - 2014/3/20

N2 - The late colonial era in Uganda was not an easy time to keep families intact. Colonial officials, missionaries, and concerned East Africans offered their diagnoses of the problems and prescriptions for responding to the dilemma. In this context, Balokole Anglican revivalists articulated new patterns and ideals of family life. These new patterns of family life were not uniform across Uganda or East Africa, but they did share common characteristics that were derived from the spiritual disciplines and religious beliefs of the Balokole revival. As such, this essay argues that the revival movement was not simply a new message of eternal salvation or primarily a form of dissent, but rather a means through which a group of African Christians sought to address quotidian domestic problems and concerns of late-colonial East Africa.

AB - The late colonial era in Uganda was not an easy time to keep families intact. Colonial officials, missionaries, and concerned East Africans offered their diagnoses of the problems and prescriptions for responding to the dilemma. In this context, Balokole Anglican revivalists articulated new patterns and ideals of family life. These new patterns of family life were not uniform across Uganda or East Africa, but they did share common characteristics that were derived from the spiritual disciplines and religious beliefs of the Balokole revival. As such, this essay argues that the revival movement was not simply a new message of eternal salvation or primarily a form of dissent, but rather a means through which a group of African Christians sought to address quotidian domestic problems and concerns of late-colonial East Africa.

KW - Ankole

KW - colonialism

KW - conversion

KW - East African Revival

KW - family

KW - Uganda

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84926144227&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84926144227&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1163/15700666-12340021

DO - 10.1163/15700666-12340021

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84926144227

VL - 44

SP - 309

EP - 332

JO - Journal of Religion in Africa

JF - Journal of Religion in Africa

SN - 0022-4200

IS - 3-4

ER -