The systemic model of crime and institutional efficacy

An analysis of the social context of offender reintegration

Kevin Wright, Travis C. Pratt, Christopher T. Lowenkamp, Edward J. Latessa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The systemic model of crime has received considerable empirical attention from criminologists; yet, an often-neglected component of the theoretical framework is the role of social institutions as a source of both formal and informal social control. Accordingly, the current study builds on recent research that considers the importance of institutional strength for the reduction of criminal behavior; in particular, the authors assess the impact of social-structural characteristics on the treatment program integrity (i.e., institutional efficacy) of 38 halfway house programs in Ohio. The authors' results indicate that communities suffering from concentrated resource deprivation have a more difficult time creating and maintaining strong institutions of public social control. The implications for criminological theory and correctional policy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-111
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Crime
Halfway Houses
Informal Social Control
Research
Social Context
Social Control
Efficacy
Offenders
Therapeutics
Criminal Behavior
Sociological Factors
Social Institutions
Deprivation
Theoretical Framework
Integrity
Resources

Keywords

  • institutional efficacy
  • offender treatment
  • systemic model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Applied Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The systemic model of crime and institutional efficacy : An analysis of the social context of offender reintegration. / Wright, Kevin; Pratt, Travis C.; Lowenkamp, Christopher T.; Latessa, Edward J.

In: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, Vol. 57, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 92-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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