The stability and resiliency of self-control in a sample of incarcerated offenders

Ojmarrh Mitchell, Doris Layton MacKenzie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

The central tenet of Gottfredson and Hirschi's self-control theory is that antisocial behavior is caused by stable between-individual differences in self-control. They also argue that after early childhood, interventions aimed at reducing antisocial behavior will be unsuccessful, as one's level of self-control is resilient to such efforts. This research tested the stability and resiliency hypotheses using a two-wave panel design in a sample of incarcerated offenders. The results indicated that self-control was not stable during a short period of time but that self-control was resilient to participation in a treatmentoriented boot-camp program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-449
Number of pages18
JournalCrime and Delinquency
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Correctional boot camps
  • Criminological theory
  • Self-control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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